SLN Webinar – Climate risk for communities’ livelihoods & its implications for human-wildlife conflict

 

Climate change is perhaps the overarching threat to snow leopards and their habitat. Knowledge about its impact on the species, its habitat and the people who share that habitat is growing but still remains incomplete and fragmentary. As our understanding of climate change impacts changes over time the Snow Leopard Network hopes to bring together experts and resource persons together to open up perspectives and share ideas for the way forward. Join us on this 3rd webinar with a focus on climate change as we continue to share the latest thinking and evidence that is emerging on this key issue. We are particularly pleased to welcome Dr. Eirini Skrimizea, a postdoctoral researcher who focusses on the governance of socio-ecological development and the social aspects of climate change.  

About the talk

How does climate change affect snow leopards and may intensify human-wildlife conflict?

Why is it relevant to conduct climate risk assessments focusing on communities’ livelihoods and their interaction with wildlife, and how to do so?

What is the added value of such climate risk assessments to snow leopard conservation programmes and goals?

During this seminar, Dr. Eirini Skrimizea will address these questions drawing insights from the climate risk assessment the Eurac Research team conducted in Kyrgyzstan for UNEP’s “Vanishing Treasures Programme – Snow Leopard in Central Asia’ component”.

The Vanishing Treasures Programme aims at protecting mountain flagship species generating maximum synergy between climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation; the climate risk assessment has been a crucial analytical step to understand and structure the climate risk so as to ensure climate-smart and climate-proof conservation actions. The talk will discuss the role and step-by-step methodology of this climate risk assessment with the goal to support the transferability of the approach to other communities and contexts.  Dr. Ranjini Murali, who has been supporting the social, policy and on-ground implementation of the Vanishing  Treasures Programme in Kyrgyzstan, will facilitate the webinar and the presentation will be followed by a Q&A session with Ulukbek Visid uulu as discussant.

About Our Guest – Eirini Skrimizea

Dr. Eirini Skrimizea is a post-doctoral researcher and graduate teaching associate at the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at KU Leuven in Belgium. She is an interdisciplinary scholar with a background in surveying engineering, spatial planning and sustainability studies. She holds a joint PhD degree in Urban Studies from Gran Sasso Science Institute and Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, and has worked at INRA, Eurac Research and DG ECHO of the European Commission. Her research focuses on the accelerated intensification of human-environment interactions covering themes such as the development-climate change nexus, community resilience, sustainable agriculture and food systems, with case-study research in Africa, Asia and Europe.

About Our Discussant – Ulukbek Visid uulu

Ulukbek Visid uulu, Program coordinator at Snow Leopard Trust, has a proven track record of 7 years in public policy and public administration at all levels, from local authorities to the government. Strongly skilled in legislation analysis, policy advocacy, monitoring and evaluation of governmental action plans/programs, partnership building and interaction with public/private organizations, CSOs engagement in government processes. Has extensive knowledge on handling cross-functional tasks related to policy development and its advocacy within public service and project management at international organizations.

He spent four years with the GSLEP building partnerships with local communities in rural areas to create an alternative sustainable source of income.

About Our Facilitator – Ranjini Murali

Dr. Ranjini Murali had over ten years experience working in snow leopard landscapes. She is currently a postdoctoral researcher at the Biography Lab in Humboldt Universität zu Berlin. She works on understanding the impacts sudden of institutional changes on large carnivore populations. She’s also a conservation scientist with the Snow Leopard Trust and affiliated with the Global Snow Leopard Ecosystem Programme (GSLEP).

Date/Time

Monday, October 10th, 2022, at 15:30 am Bishkek time

Location

 ZOOM, to join this talk, REGISTER HERE

 Please note

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.
  • Please note that the session will be recorded and later featured on the SLN website. If you have concerns about this please let us know before the session.

Did you miss our other Climate Change focussed Webinars on SLN?

Do checkout our previous webinars or trainings with a focus on Climate Change:

Celebrating 20 years of the Snow Leopard Network- Webinar Recording now available

It all started back in 2002 – twenty years ago. The Snow Leopard Survival Summit brought together over 60 experts from 17 countries to develop what was to become the Snow Leopard Survival Strategy. From that meeting the Snow Leopard Network was founded with a Steering Committee of eight elected members. Many of the 2002 Summit participants, are still working in snow leopard conservation today. Now, with over 500 members and 28 organisations, the Snow Leopard Network provides a platform for an increasing number of practitioners across Asia and the world around snow leopard conservation.

Join us on September 13th, 2022, where we will take the opportunity to look back and highlight some key moments and achievements of the Network. We are bringing together 5 distinguished Steering Committee members from different periods of time to share experiences and reflections through photographic images and their accounts. We will also use this opportunity to look to the future of the Network.   

Celebrating 20 years of the Snow Leopard Network

It all started back in 2002 – twenty years ago. The Snow Leopard Survival Summit brought together over 60 experts from 17 countries to develop what was to become the Snow Leopard Survival Strategy. From that meeting the Snow Leopard Network was founded with a Steering Committee of eight elected members. Many of the 2002 Summit participants, are still working in snow leopard conservation today. Now, with over 500 members and 28 organisations, the Snow Leopard Network provides a platform for an increasing number of practitioners across Asia and the world around snow leopard conservation.

Join us on September 13th, 2022, where we will take the opportunity to look back and highlight some key moments and achievements of the Network. We are bringing together 5 distinguished Steering Committee members from different periods of time to share experiences and reflections through photographic images and their accounts. We will also use this opportunity to look to the future of the Network.   

The format of the Celebratory Session will include a rolling photo-montage of SLN’s timeline by our 5 previous Steering Committee members. Each will span a different moment and perspective on the evolution of snow leopard conservation as a science and discipline. Tom McCarthy will open the timeline with an account of why SLN came into being. Yash Veer Bhatnagar, Muhammad Ali Nawaz, Sibylle Noras will take the story up to 2019 noting changes in conservation thinking over this time. Lingyun Xiao will take us to the present day and take stock.  This travel in time will be followed by a round table discussion exploring what have been the critical factors at play in snow leopard conservation, how these have changed, and may change in the future.

We also warmly welcome other SLN members who have taken part over time – either through the Grants Program (past recipients), as SC chairs and members, or in other capacities – who would like to join the discussion and share their insights.

Join us in celebrating the history of snow leopard conservation over the last 20 years!

Date/Time

Tuesday, September 13th, 2022, at 11:00am Bishkek time

Location

 ZOOM, to join this talk, REGISTER HERE

 Please note

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.
  • Please note that the session will be recorded and later featured on the SLN website. If you have concerns about this please let us know before the session.

 

 

SLN Webinar – Towards improved parasite transmission understanding: A case study from the Indian Trans-Himalaya

 

The Snow Leopard Network is pleased to announce our next webinar with a focus on investigating disease transmission in high altitude settings. We will travel to the Trans-Himalayas of India with a team of researchers who are looking at snow leopard conservation from a wider perspective – and considering the interactions between parasites, livestock and wild ungulates.

We are pleased to welcome Dr. Munib Khanyari and Dr. Manvi Sharma. Our guests will give a particular focus on how multi-use landscapes, home to both wildlife and livestock-dependent herders, require context specific approaches to addressing disease transmission risks. Do join us!

About the Talk

During this talk we will travel to the mountains of Spiti, India. Munib and team explored gastro-intestinal nematode (GINs) infections between wild Bharal and domestic livestock. This was done through a socio-ecological lens, integrating parasite transmission modelling with field surveys and local knowledge. The team then evaluated the likely effectiveness of potential conservation and policy interventions. The main aim of the study was to provide a transferable multi-pronged approach to investigating disease transmission, in order to support herders’ livelihoods and conserve wild ungulates.

About Our Guest – Munib Khanyari

Munib recently completed his PhD that looked at investigating the impact of environmental and social factors on gastro-intestinal nematode (GINs) transmission dynamics between interacting domestic and wild ungulates, exhibiting spatio-temporal dynamics, in temperate Asian rangelands. Munib now works with the Nature Conservation Foundation as a Program Manager. He works primarily across the Trans-Himalayan region of India, aiming to build positive human-nature relationships.

About our Facilitator – Manvi Sharma

Manvi is postdoctoral fellow at the High Altitudes program at Nature Conservation Foundation. She is interested in understanding the diversity in predator and prey traits and how biological communities interact and are assembled. She uses approaches from behavioural, population, and community ecology to answer questions about how animals can show a diverse set of responses to the changing problems around them. She has been interested in carnivore ecology and she is interested in using interdisciplinary approaches to understand and manage carnivore and human relationships in the Indian Himalaya. 

Date/Time:  Tuesday, 30th August, 2022 – 2:00PM Bishkek time.

 

Location: ZOOM, to join this talk, REGISTER HERE

 Please note:

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.

 

SLN Webinar – Tracing the Blue Eyes: The Genetic Ancestry of the Chinese Mountain Cat

The Genetic Ancestry of the Chinese Mountain Cat

The Snow Leopard Network welcomes you to our next webinar on the Chinese Mountain Cat with Dr. Shu-Jin Luo, from Peking University, China.

Our Guest

Dr. Shu-Jin Luo is a Principal Investigator at the School of Life Sciences, Peking University, China. A conservation and evolutionary geneticist with a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota and a postdoc at the National Cancer Institute in Maryland, Dr. Luo is leading an active research team working on the genetics of wild and domestic cats and is the lead author discovering the new Malayan tiger subspecies Panthera tigris jacksoni, finding the genetic causes of the white tiger, and elucidating the evolutionary histories of various endangered felids including the tiger, leopard cat, and the Chinese mountain cat. Dr. Luo is a member of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group since 2005 and a council member for the American Genetic Association (AGA) since 2020.

Dr. Shu Jin Luo will be joined by a facilitator and key discussant exchanging ideas and approaches for safeguarding high altitude ecosystems.  

Date/Time

Tuesday, June 28th, 2022, at 04:00 PM Beijing, Shanghai

Location

 ZOOM, to join this talk, REGISTER HERE

 Please note

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.
  • Please note that the session will be recorded and later featured on the SLN website. If you have concerns about this please let us know before the session.

 

Drivers of snow leopard poaching and illegal trade in Pakistan

 

Please join us in welcoming our guest speaker Fathul Bari from the University of Chitral, who shares updates on this prominent threat to snow leopards in Pakistan. This talk is followed by a discussion where we explore ideas to combat this omnipresent threat to snow leopards in greater detail, drawing upon our guests experiences and knowledge from across the world. We will have Dr. Koustubh Sharma share recent developments from GSLEP that curates a collaborative database on poaching and illegal wildlife trade in snow leopards.

Poaching and trade of snow leopards is poorly documented in Pakistan. Pakistan is however ranked for greater poaching incidents as compared to its share in the global snow leopard range. The country is also ranked among the top five countries where 90% of snow leopard poaching occurs, although seizure records for the country are low. During this talk we will discuss the dynamics and drivers of snow leopard poaching and trade from Pakistan.

 

SLN Webinar – Drivers of snow leopard poaching and illegal trade in Pakistan

 

The Snow Leopard Network invites you to join us for this Webinar on Tuesday, 24th May, 2022.  The snow leopard is facing a range of conventional and emerging threats. Poaching of snow leopards for illegal trade has been identified as one of the major threats to the species across many parts of its range. Several factors limit our ability to monitor illegal wildlife trade (IWT) and put in place effective interventions. The 2013 Bishkek declaration calls for “firm action to stop poaching and illegal trade of snow leopard and other wildlife by adopting comprehensive legislation, strengthening national law-enforcement system, enhancing national, sub regional, regional and international collaboration and developing effective mechanism to eliminate the illegal demand for snow leopard and other wildlife products”.

Please join us in welcoming our guest speaker Fathul Bari from the University of Chitral, who will share updates on this prominent threat to snow leopards in Pakistan. This talk will be followed by a discussion where we explore ideas to combat this omnipresent threat to snow leopards in greater detail, drawing upon our guests experiences and knowledge from across the world. We will have Dr. Koustubh Sharma share recent developments from GSLEP that curates a collaborative database on poaching and illegal wildlife trade in snow leopards.

About the Talk

Poaching and trade of snow leopards is poorly documented in Pakistan. Pakistan is however ranked for greater poaching incidents as compared to its share in the global snow leopard range. The country is also ranked among the top five countries where 90% of snow leopard poaching occurs, although seizure records for the country are low. During this talk we will discuss the dynamics and drivers of snow leopard poaching and trade from Pakistan.

Our Guests

Mr. Fathul Bari is based at the Department of Zoology, University of Chitral. He works on wildlife resources of the mountainous areas focusing on contemporary conservation issues. His research on illegal wildlife trade is based on data collected from local respondents, markets, media, NGOs and divisional & provincial wildlife departments. He has been working in the snow leopard range for the past several years and gained vast experience in wildlife research and conservation.

Koustubh Sharma is the International Coordinator of the Global Snow Leopard and Ecosystem Protection Program (GSLEP) and the Assistant Director of Conservation Policy and Partnerships at the Snow Leopard Trust. With more than 20 years of experience in ecological research, wildlife conservation and training, he helps build collaborations and coordinate alliances at multiple levels for snow leopard research and conservation.

Date/Time:  Tuesday 24th May, 2022 at 1:30 PM IST (India)

Location: ZOOM, to join this talk, REGISTER HERE

 Please note:

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.

 

 

SLN Webinar: Snow leopards on the Tibetan Plateau: Diets, interspecific relationships, and livestock consumption

The Snow Leopard Network is pleased to announce our 4th #snowleopard webinar of 2022. SLN is delighted to bring back a focus on exploring snow leopard Genetics. In November 2020, we hosted an overview discussion with Dr. Ramakrishnan and a launched with partners a training initiative specifically focussing on genetic research techniques.

We welcome Dr. Meng Yao and Dr. Cheng Chen who are leading genetic research on snow leopards and other mountain carnivores on the Tibetan Plateau, China. This Webinar allows us to meet researchers at Peking University whose work bridge the world of snow leopards with wider prey and predator interactions. Genetic methods and their applications keep evolving and offer new possibilities of understand and conserving threatened wildlife -> join us for a discussion on how teams are growing and taking forward these approaches with snow leopards and other species. 

About the Talk

Dr. Meng Yao will open the event with the main presentation. As many SLN members know, snow leopards are highly elusive and it is extremely difficult to observe their behaviour in the field. Luckily, the advances of molecular tools enable a peek into their mysterious life on the Tibetan plateau. Using DNA extracted from snow leopard faeces, it has been possible to decipher snow leopard diets and food preferences at fine species resolution, and analyze their niche relationship with other co-existing carnivores in the Minshan Mountains of Sichuan and the Sanjiangyuan Region of Qinghai, China. In addition, insight into the factors affecting the carnivore’s livestock consumption has been gained. We discuss how this study links to conservation management design and mitigates human-snow leopard conflict. Dr. Cheng Chen will join us as Discussant sharing her perspectives from wider work on snow leopard genetics in China.

Qi Lu, a PhD candidate of the team, is extracting DNA from snow leopard faecal samples in the laboratory.

About our Guests

Dr. Meng Yao

Meng Yao received Ph.D. in molecular cellular & developmental biology from the University of Michigan. She began her appointment at Peking University in 2009, first as an Assistant Professor and currently as a Research Associate Professor. She is a molecular ecologist and conservation geneticist whose research interests include food-web interactions, environmental DNA-based biodiversity monitoring, and population genetics. She applies faecal DNA metabarcoding to reconstruct feeding habits and niche relationships among mammalian carnivores and aquatic eDNA to the detection of invasive species and biodiversity.

Dr. Cheng Chen

Cheng Chen is Program Director of the Nature Watch Program, in Shanshui Conservation Center. She worked on population genetics of Sichuan snub-nosed monkey and snow leopard landscape genetic conservation in Sanjiangyuan during her PHD and postdoc with the Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences and Center for Nature and Society of Peking University. She has established a genetics research platform for supporting wildlife conservation in Sanjiangyuan National Park. Since 2015, she has been continuously coordinating and promoting the Snow Leopard China network. Since 2019, she started the current position as Director of the Nature Watch Program, and is mainly focused on and dedicated to promoting the mainstreaming of biodiversity conservation from the perspectives of biodiversity databases, policy advocacy and sustainable investment.

Date/Time

Tuesday, 29th  March, 2022 at 16:00 Beijing time

Register today

Register Here!

 Please note

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.
  • Please note that the session will be recorded and later featured on the SLN website. If you have concerns about this please let us know before the session.

 

Qi Lu, a PhD candidate of the team, collecting snow leopard faeces in Qinghai

Women and Voices from Periphery

The high Himalayan landscape in Himachal Pradesh is fascinating geography with unique biodiversity. The communities share a rich understanding of living harmoniously with nature and coexisting with wildlife around them. Deepshikha & Chemi reflect upon how women from these landscapes navigate conservation spaces, the joys, and struggles of bringing them to the forefront, and their experiences of building conservation champions and outreach networks.

Women and Voices from Periphery: SLN & International Women’s Day

The Snow Leopard Network is hosting a special event for International Women’s Day, March 8th 2022. The theme for this year’s 2022 International Day is Gender equality today for a sustainable tomorrow. Our event takes this theme into highlighting the opportunities for translating gender equality into practice of community conservation.

We are delighted to welcome Deepshikha Sharma and Chemi Lhamo who have been working in the high Himalayas of Spiti, India on snow leopard conservation with the Nature Conservation Foundation India. Our guests bring a unique perspective of bringing new and long term programs to support women at community level, including identifying and empower women champions for snow leopard conservation. We are looking forward to hearing their account and how their work contributes to a ‘sustainable tomorrow’ for snow leopard landscapes.

Following SLN’s Women & Conservation Series launched in 2021, we organized a poll on Twitter asking members and the conservation community what they considered to be of greatest interest for an online discussion related to gender and conservation. Participants fed back that they would welcome additional discussions related to gender and community conservation. The March 8th event gives us an opportunity not only to hear from most recent experiences in Spiti, India but also a chance to provide a platform for SLN members to share examples of gender sensitive or responsive community conservation for snow leopards. 

After the main presentation and questions we will dedicate the remainder of the session to collating these examples and experiences. With this in mind we specially encourage SLN members to come ready to communicate briefly: links of projects or documented examples of similar efforts that we can subsequently add to SLN’s resource centre. Do join us to promote these themes. 

About the Talk

The high Himalayan landscape in Himachal Pradesh is fascinating geography with unique biodiversity. The communities share a rich understanding of living harmoniously with nature and coexisting with wildlife around them. Deepshikha & Chemi will reflect upon how women from these landscapes navigate conservation spaces, the joys, and struggles of bringing them to the forefront, and their experiences of building conservation champions and outreach networks.

Photo by the Nature Conservation Foundation

About our Guests

Deepshikha has a master’s degree in Development from Azim Premji University and is currently working as a conservation coordinator at Nature Conservation Foundation. She has been facilitating community-led conservation in upper Kinnaur, Lahaul and Spiti in Himachal Pradesh and in parts of Ladakh. She has been involved in the community issue of livestock depredation by wildlife and has been working towards raising awareness and reducing losses faced by herders. She is also working towards bringing local women to the forefront of conservation in the landscape.

 

Chemi has completed her post-graduate studies in Literature from the University of Delhi. She has worked in the Indian development sector as a communication professional raising awareness and engagement around issues of rural development, menstrual health & disaster relief, and rehabilitation. She currently works with NCF’s High Altitude Program to support conservation outreach in Lahaul-Spiti, Kinnaur & Ladakh. She is interested in exploring wildlife conservation through the lens of social justice and intersectionality.

Date/Time

Tuesday, March 8th, 2022 at 17:00 India time

Register today here

Please note

  • If you have never used Zoom before, we recommend that you try the link 10 minutes before the start of the lecture.
  • Please feel free to write questions in the comment area and there will be time for questions/discussion at the end of the talk.
  • Please note that the session will be recorded and later featured on the SLN website. If you have concerns about this please let us know before the session.
Photo by the Nature Conservation Foundation
Photo by the Nature Conservation Foundation
Photo by the Nature Conservation Foundation