|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author Samelius, G., Suryawanshi, K., Frank, J., Agvaantseren, B., Baasandamba, E., Mijiddorj, T., Johansson, O., Tumursukh, L., Mishra, C.
Title Keeping predators out: testing fences to reduce livestock depredation at night-time corrals Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Oryx Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-7
Keywords Canis lupus, carnivore conservation, coexistence, conflict mitigation, conservation conflict, livestock depreda- tion, Panthera uncia, preventative measure
Abstract Livestock depredation by large carnivores is a global conservation challenge, and mitigation measures to reduce livestock losses are crucial for the coexistence of large carnivores and people. Various measures are employed to reduce livestock depredation but their effectiveness has rarely been tested. In this study, we tested the effectiveness of tall fences to reduce livestock losses to snow leopards Panthera uncia and wolves Canis lupus at night-time corrals at the winter camps of livestock herders in the Tost Mountains in southern Mongolia. Self-reported livestock losses at the fenced corrals were reduced from a mean loss of 3.9 goats and sheep per family and winter prior to the study to zero losses in the two winters of the study. In contrast, self-reported livestock losses in winter pastures, and during the rest of the year, when herders used different camps, remained high, which indicates that livestock losses were reduced because of the fences, not because of temporal variation in predation pressure. Herder attitudes towards snow leopards were positive and remained positive during the study, whereas attitudes towards wolves, which attacked livestock also in summer when herders moved out on the steppes, were negative and worsened during the study. This study showed that tall fences can be very effective at reducing night-time losses at corrals and we conclude that fences can be an important tool for snow leopard conservation and for facilitating the coexistence of snow leopards and people.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1492
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Poyarkov, A. D., Munkhtsog, B., Korablev, M. P., Kuksin, A. N., Alexandrov, D. Y., Chistopolova, M. D.,Hernandez-Blanco, J. A., Munkhtogtokh, O., Karnaukhov, A. S., Lkhamsuren, N., Bayaraa, M., Jackson, R. M., Maheshwari, A., Rozhnov, V. V.
Title Assurance of the existence of a trans-boundary population of the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) at Tsagaanshuvuut – Tsagan- Shibetu SPA at the Mongolia-Russia border Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Integrative Zoology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 15 Pages 224-231
Keywords FST, home range, Panthera uncia, snow leopard, trans-boundary population
Abstract The existence of a trans-boundary population of the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) that inhabits the massifs of Tsagaanshuvuut (Mongolia) – Tsagan-Shibetu (Russia) was determined through non-invasive genetic analysis of scat samples and by studying the structure of territory use by a collared female individual. The genetic analysis included species identification of samples through sequencing of a fragment of the cytochrome b gene and individual identification using a panel of 8 microsatellites. The home range of a female snow leopard marked with a satellite Global Positioning System (GPS) collar was represented by the minimum convex polygon method (MCP) 100, the MCP 95 method and the fixed kernel 95 method. The results revealed insignificant genetic differentiation between snow leopards that inhabit both massifs (minimal fixation index [FST]), and the data testify to the unity of the cross-border group. Moreover, 5 common individuals were identified from Mongolian and Russian territories. This finding clearly shows that their home range includes territories of both countries. In addition, regular movement of a collared snow leopard in Mongolia and Russia confirmed the existence of a cross-border snow leopard group. These data support that trans-boundary conservation is important for snow leopards in both countries. We conclude that it is crucial for Russia to study the northern range of snow leopards in Asia.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1493
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Johansson, O., Samelius, G., Wikberg, E, Chapron, G., Mishra, C., Low, M
Title Identification errors in camera- trap studies result in systematic population overestimation Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2020 Publication Scientific Reports Abbreviated Journal
Volume 10 Issue 6393 Pages 1-10
Keywords
Abstract Reliable assessments of animal abundance are key for successful conservation of endangered species. For elusive animals with individually-unique markings, camera-trap surveys are a benchmark standard for estimating local and global population abundance. Central to the reliability of resulting abundance estimates is the assumption that individuals are accurately identified from photographic captures. To quantify the risk of individual misidentification and its impact on population abundance estimates we performed an experiment under controlled conditions in which 16 captive snow leopards (Panthera uncia) were camera-trapped on 40 occasions and eight observers independently identified individuals and recaptures. Observers misclassified 12.5% of all capture occasions, resulting in systematically inflated population abundance estimates on average by one third (mean ± SD = 35 ± 21%). Our results show that identifying individually-unique individuals from camera-trap photos may not be as reliable as previously believed, implying that elusive and endangered species could be less abundant than current estimates indicate.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1496
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Suryawanshi, K. R., Khanyari, M., Sharma, K., Lkhagvajav, P., Mishra, C.
Title Sampling bias in snow leopard population estimation studies Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Population Eccology Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-9
Keywords camera trap, Central Asia, Himalaya, meta-analysis, monitoring, Panthera uncia, population ecology
Abstract Accurate assessments of the status of threatened species and their conservation

planning require reliable estimation of their global populations and robust monitoring

of local population trends. We assessed the adequacy and suitability of studies

in reliably estimating the global snow leopard (Panthera uncia) population. We

compiled a dataset of all the peer-reviewed published literature on snow leopard

population estimation. Metadata analysis showed estimates of snow leopard density

to be a negative exponential function of area, suggesting that study areas have generally

been too small for accurate density estimation, and sampling has often been

biased towards the best habitats. Published studies are restricted to six of the

12 range countries, covering only 0.3�0.9% of the presumed global range of the

species. Re-sampling of camera trap data from a relatively large study site

(c.1684 km2) showed that small-sized study areas together with a bias towards

good quality habitats in existing studies may have overestimated densities by up to

five times. We conclude that current information is biased and inadequate for generating

a reliable global population estimate of snow leopards. To develop a rigorous

and useful baseline and to avoid pitfalls, there is an urgent need for

(a) refinement of sampling and analytical protocols for population estimation of

snow leopards (b) agreement and coordinated use of standardized sampling protocols

amongst researchers and governments across the range, and (c) sampling

larger and under-represented areas of the snow leopard's global range.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1477
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Chetri, M, Odden, M., Sharma, K., Flagstad, O., Wegge, P
Title Estimating snow leopard density using fecal DNA in a large landscape in north-central Nepal Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 17 Pages 1-8
Keywords Panthera uncia, Density, Annapurna-Manaslu landscape, Noninvasive, Spatial scale
Abstract Although abundance estimates have a strong bearing on the conservation status of a

species, less than 2% of the global snow leopard distribution range has been sampled

systematically, mostly in small survey areas. In order to estimate snow leopard density

across a large landscape, we collected 347 putative snow leopard scats from 246 transects

(490 km) in twenty-six 5  5km sized sampling grid cells within 4393 km2 in Annapurna-

Manaslu, Nepal. From 182 confirmed snow leopard scats, 81 were identified as belonging

to 34 individuals; the remaining were discarded for their low (<0.625) quality index. Using

maximum likelihood based spatial capture recapture analysis, we developed candidate

model sets to test effects of various covariates on density and detection of scats on transects.

The best models described the variation in density as a quadratic function of

elevation and detection as a linear function of topography. The average density estimate of

snow leopards for the area of interest within Nepal was 0.95 (SE 0.19) animals per 100 km2

(0.66e1.41 95% CL) with predicted densities varying between 0.1 and 1.9 in different parts,

thus highlighting the heterogeneity in densities as a function of habitat types. Our density

estimate was low compared to previous estimates from smaller study areas. Probably,

estimates from some of these areas were inflated due to locally high abundances in overlap

zones (hotspots) of neighboring individuals, whose territories probably range far beyond

study area borders. Our results highlight the need for a large-scale approach in snow

leopard monitoring, and we recommend that methodological problems related to spatial

scale are taken into account in future snow leopard research.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1478
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jamtsho, Y., Katel, O.
Title Livestock depredation by snow leopard and Tibetan wolf: Implications for herders&#65533; livelihoods in Wangchuck Centennial National Park, Bhutan Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Springer Open Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 9:1 Pages 1-10
Keywords Wildlife-livestock conflicts, Endangered predators, Protected area, Income loss
Abstract Human-wildlife conflict (HWC) is a serious problem in many parts of the world, and Bhutan&#65533;s Wangchuck Centennial

National Park (WCNP) is no exception. Located in the remote alpine areas of the eastern Himalaya, wildlife species

such as snow leopard (SL) and Tibetan wolf (TW) are reported to kill livestock in many parts of the Park. Such

depredation is believed to have affected the livelihoods of high-altitude herding communities, resulting in conflicts

between them. This study provides analysis on the extent of livestock depredation by wildlife predators such as SL

and TW and examines its implications for the livelihoods of herding communities of Choekhortoe and Dhur regions

of WCNP. Using semi-structured questionnaires, all herders (n = 38) in the study area were interviewed. The questions

pertained to livestock population, frequency of depredation and income lost due to depredation in the last five years

from 2012 to 2016. This study recorded 2,815 livestock heads in the study area, with an average herd size of 74.1 stock.

The average herd size holding showed a decreasing trend over the years, and one of the reasons cited by the herders

is depredation by SL and TW and other predators. This loss equated to an average annual financial loss equivalent to

10.2% (US$837) of their total per capita cash income. Such losses have resulted in negative impacts on herders&#65533;

livelihood; e.g. six herders (2012-2016) even stopped rearing livestock and resorted to an alternate source of cash

income. The livestock intensification programmes, including pasture improvement through allowing controlled

burning, and financial compensation, may be some potential short-term solutions to reduce conflict between herders

and predators. Issuing permits for cordyceps (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) collection only to the herders and instilling the

sense of stewardship to highland herders may be one of the long-term solutions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1479
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kalashnikova, Y. A., Karnaukhov, A. S., Dubinin, M. Y., Poyarkov, A. D., Rozhnov, V. V.
Title POTENTIAL HABITAT OF SNOW LEOPARD (PANTHERA UNCIA, FELINAE) IN SOUTH SIBERIA AND ADJACENT TERRITORIES BASED ON THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY DISTRIBUTION MODEL Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume 98 Issue 3 Pages 332-342
Keywords Snow leopard, irbis, Panthera uncia, Maxent, habitat model, potential habitat
Abstract The snow leopard is an endangered large felid inhabiting highlands of 12 Asian countries. It is distributed

across vast territories and adequate modern methods are required for mapping its potential habitats. The goal

of the present study is to create a model of snow leopard potential habitat within the northern part of its range

in Russia (and adjacent territories of Mongolia, China and Kazakhstan). More than 5 years of observations

(total number of presence points = 449), environmental variables and the maximum entropy distribution

method (Maxent) are used. The resulting map demonstrates that a suitable habitat (probability of the animal&#65533;s

presence between 0.5 and 1) of the northern population of snow leopard in Russia occupies 16500 km2

with a buffer of transient territories (probability between 0.25 and 0.49) covering 32800 km2. Most of a suitable

habitat within the study area is associated with the Altai Mountains, Western Sayan Mountains, Sangilen

Plateau, Tsagan-Shibetu and Shapshal. One third of the suitable habitat lies within areas of a varying protection

status. The results of modeling are of importance both for scientists and conservation managers, as they

allow for leopard occurrence to be predicted, supporting research on and the conservation of the species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1480
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Janjua,S., Peters, J. L., Weckworth, B., Abbas, F. I., Bahn, Volker, Johansson, O., Rooney, T.P.
Title Improving our conservation genetic toolkit: ddRAD-seq for SNPs in snow leopards Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Conservation Genetic Resource Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords
Abstract Snow leopards (Panthera uncia) are an enigmatic, high-altitude species whose challenging habitat, low population densities

and patchy distribution have presented challenges for scientists studying its biology, population structure, and genetics.

Molecular scatology brings a new hope for conservation efforts by providing valuable insights about snow leopards, including

their distribution, population densities, connectivity, habitat use, and population structure for assigning conservation units.

However, traditional amplification of microsatellites from non-invasive sources of DNA are accompanied by significant

genotyping errors due to low DNA yield and poor quality. These errors can lead to incorrect inferences in the number of

individuals and estimates of genetic diversity. Next generation technologies have revolutionized the depth of information

we can get from a species' genome. Here we used double digest restriction-site associated DNA sequencing (ddRAD-seq),

a well-established technique for studying non-model organisms, to develop a reference sequence library for snow leopards

using blood samples from five Mongolian individuals. Our final data set reveals 4504 loci with a median size range of 221 bp.

We identified 697 SNPs and low nucleotide diversity (0.00032) within these loci. However, the probability that two random

individuals will share identical genotypes is about 10-168. We developed probes for DNA capture using this sequence library

which can now be used for genotyping individuals from scat samples. Genetic data from ddRAD-seq will be invaluable for

conducting population and landscape scale studies that can inform snow leopard conservation strategies.
Address Snow leopard · ddRAD-seq · Next generation sequencing · SNP discovery
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1483
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Maheshwari, A. , Sathyakumar, S.
Title Snow leopard stewardship in mitigating human-wildlife conflict in Hemis National Park, Ladakh, India Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Human Dimensions of Wildlife Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-5
Keywords Snow leopard; human-wildlife conflict; ecotourism; livelihood; India
Abstract Among large predators, snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and co-predators (e.g., wolves

Canis lupus, lynx Lynx lynx) often cause economic losses, engendering animosity from

local communities in the mountain ecosystem across south and central Asia (Din et al.,

2017; Jackson & Lama, 2016; Maheshwari, Takpa, Kujur, & Shawl, 2010; Schaller, 2012).

These economic losses range from around US $50 to nearly $300 per household,

a significant sum given per capita annual incomes of $250 – $400 (Jackson & Wangchuk,

2004; Mishra, 1997). Recent efforts such as improved livestock husbandry practices

(predator-proof livestock corrals – closed night shelters with covered roof with wiremesh

and a closely fitting iron or wooden door that can be securely locked at night) and

community-based ecotourism (e.g., home stays, guides, porters, pack animals, campsites)

are providing alternative livelihood opportunities and mitigating large carnivores – human

conflict in the snow leopard habitats (Hanson, Schutgens, & Baral, 2018; Jackson, 2015;

Jackson & Lama, 2016; Vannelli, Hampton, Namgail, & Black, 2019). Snow leopard-based

ecotourism provides an opportunity to secure livelihoods and reduce poverty of the

communities living in ecotourism sites across Ladakh (Chandola, 2012; Jackson, 2015).

To understand the role of snow leopard-based ecotourism in uplifting the financial profile

of local communities, mitigating large carnivore – human conflict and eventually changing

attitudes towards large carnivores in Hemis National Park, Ladakh, India, we compared

the estimated financial gains of a snow leopard-based ecotourism to stated livestock

predation losses by snow leopards and wolves.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1484
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Shrestha, A., Thapa, K., Subba, S. A., Dhakal, M., Devkota, B. P., Thapa, G. J., Shrestha, S., Malla, S., Thapa, K.
Title Cats, canines, and coexistence: dietary differentiation between the sympatric Snow Leopard and Grey Wolf in the western landscape of Nepal Himalaya Type Journal Article
Year (down) 2019 Publication Journal of Threatened Taxa Abbreviated Journal
Volume 11 Issue 7 Pages 13815-13821
Keywords Canis lupus, dietary pattern, dietary overlap, livestock, Naur, negative interaction, Panthera uncia, scat analysis, sympatry
Abstract Understanding the dietary habits of sympatric apex carnivores advances our knowledge of ecological processes and aids their conservation. We compared the diets of the sympatric Snow Leopard Panthera uncia and Grey Wolf Canis lupus using standard micro-histological analyses of scats collected from the western complex of Nepal Himalaya. Our study revealed one of the highest recorded contributions of livestock to the diet of top predators (55% for Grey Wolf and 39% for Snow Leopard) and high dietary overlap (0.82) indicating potential exploitative or interference competition. Their diet composition, however, varied significantly based on their consumption of wild and domestic prey. Limitation in data precludes predicting direction and outcome of inter-specific interactions between these predators. Our findings suggest a high rate of negative interaction with humans in the region and plausibly retaliatory killings of these imperilled predators. To ensure the sustained survival of these two apex carnivores, conservation measures should enhance populations of their wild prey species while reducing livestock losses of the local community through preventive and mitigative interventions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1485
Permanent link to this record