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Author Jackson, R. url  openurl
  Title Pakistan's Community-based Trophy Hunting Programs and Their Relationship to Snow Leopard Conservation Type Manuscript
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords Pakistan; community-based; hunting; programs; program; Relationship; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; conservation; network  
  Abstract In June-July 2004, the Snow Leopard Conservancy (SLC) recently conducted field visits to three important snow leopard sites in Pakistan's Northern Areas: Hushey and Skoyo villages in Baltistan and the Khunjerab Village Organization (KVO) in Gojal. The purpose was to launch environmentally appropriate small-scale, village-based conservation and depredation alleviation initiatives aimed at protecting snow leopards, prey species, their habitats and associated mountain biodiversity, while benefiting humans at the same time.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes For consideration by The Snow Leopard Network (SLN) Committee on Position Statements Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1024 Serial 472  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jackson, R.M. url  openurl
  Title Home Range, Movements and Habitat use of Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia) in Nepal Type Book Whole
  Year 1996 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 233 pp  
  Keywords Nepal; blue-sheep; predator; prey; home-range; behavior; capture; telemetry; habitat; marking; activity; movement; tracking; blue; sheep; browse; home range; home; range; 990  
  Abstract Home ranges for five radio-tagged snow leopards (Uncia uncia) inhabiting prime habitat in Nepal Himalaya varied in size from 11-37 km2. These solitary felids were crepuscular in activity, and although highly mobile, nearly 90% of all consecutive day movements involved a straight line distance of 2km or less. No seasonal difference in daily movement or home range boundry was detected. While home ranges overlapped substancially, use of common core spaces was temporally seperated, with tagged animals being located 1.9 km or more apart during the smae day. Spatial analysis indicated that 47-55% of use occured within only 6-15% of total home area. The snow leopards shared a common core use area, which was located at a major stream confuence in an area where topography, habitat and prey abundance appeared to be more favorable. A young female used her core area least, a female with two cubs to the greatest extent. the core area was marked significantly more with scrapes, Faeces and other sighn than non-core sites, suggesting that social marking plays an important role in spacing individuals. Snow leopards showed a strong preference for bedding in steep, rocky or broken terrain, on or close to a natural vegetation or landform edge. linear landform features, such as a cliff or major ridgeline, were preferred for travelling and day time resting. This behavior would tend to place a snow leopard close to its preferred prey, blue sheep (Psuedois nayaur), which uses the same habitat at night. Marking was concetrated along commonly travelled routes, particularly river bluffs, cliff ledges and well defined ridgelines bordering stream confluences--features that were most abundant within the core area. Such marking may facilitate mutual avoidance, help maintain the species' solitary social structure, and also enable a relatively high density of snow leopard, especially within high-quality habitat.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher University of London Place of Publication University of London Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Date of Copyright: 1996 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 275 Serial 481  
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Author Jain, N.; Wangchuk, R.; Jackson, R. url  openurl
  Title An Assessment of CBT and Homestay Sites in Spiti District, Himachal Pradesh Type Report
  Year 2003 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords assessment; Himachal; himachal pradesh; Himachal-Pradesh; United; Organization; survey; Report; activities; activity; mountain; Tmi; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; Snow Leopard Conservancy; leopard; Ladakh; States; India; Himalayan; program; conservation; local; livelihood; asia  
  Abstract The survey described in this report builds upon prior CBT activities undertaken by The Mountain Institute (TMI) in partnership with the Snow Leopard Conservancy (SLC) in Ladakh, supported by a grant from UNESCO (with co-financing from SLC). Under the evolving concept of “Himalayan Homestays”, initially developed and tested in Ladakh, it is proposed that activities be expanded to selected states in India in a strategic and effective way. Himalayan Homestays are part of a larger integrated program to link snow leopard conservation with local livelihoods in Asia.  
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  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Supported by: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1019 Serial 483  
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Author Jegal, A.; Kashkarov, E.; Matyushkin E.N. url  openurl
  Title Simple method to distinguish tracks of snow leopard and lynx Type Manuscript
  Year 2010 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords tracks; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; Lynx; gobi; Altai; mountain; range; mountains; region; distribution; Case; local; hunters; hunter; Animals; Animal  
  Abstract In the Mongolian and Gobi Altai mountain ranges and also in some other mountains in this region, the

distribution of the snow leopard and Eurasian lynx overlaps. In some cases, local hunters cannot

distinguish the tracks of both these animals. Therefore we outline a simple method to distinguish tracks of

the snow leopard and lynx.
 
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  Notes Two English translations of article are provided. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1101 Serial 491  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jiang, Z. url  openurl
  Title Snow leopards in the Dulan International Hunting Ground, Qinghai, China Type Report
  Year 2005 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-8  
  Keywords snow; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; leopard; International; hunting; Qinghai; China; project; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust; program; surveys; survey; mountains; mountain; province; transect; study; area; transects; pug; pug marks; pug-marks; marks; scrapes; scrape; density; densities; wild; ungulates; ungulate; region; camera; environment; photo; capture; population; population size; population-size; Animals; Animal; 20; livestock; Human; attitudes; attitude; tibetan; 30; nature; reserve; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; species; snow line; snow-line; endemic; alpine; central; Central Asia; asia; countries; country; fox; range; areas; Xinjiang; inner; Inner-Mongolia; Mongolia; Tibet; gansu; Sichuan; habitat; protection; nature reserves; reserves; cat; populations; domestic; laws; law; field; field surveys; field survey; field-surveys; field-survey; Kunlun; distribution; survival; status; Data; conservation  
  Abstract From March to May, 2006œªwe conducted extensive snow leopard surveys in the Burhanbuda Mountain Kunlun Mountains, Qinghai Province, China. 32 linear transect of 5~15 km each, which running through each vegetation type, were surveyed within the study area. A total of 72 traces of snow leopard were found along 4 transects (12.5% of total transects). The traces included pug marks or footprints, scrapes and urine marks. We estimated the average density of wild ungulates in the region was 2.88ñ0.35 individuals km-2(n=29). We emplaced 16 auto2 trigger cameras in different environments and eight photos of snow leopard were shot by four cameras and the capture rate of snow leopard was 71.4%. The minimum snow leopard population size in the Burhanbuda Mountain was two, because two snow leopards were phototrapped by different cameras at almost same time. Simultaneously, the cameras also shot 63 photos of other wild animals, including five photos are unidentified wild animals, and 20 photos of livestock. We evaluated the human attitudes towards snow leopard by interviewing with 27 Tibetan householders of 30 householders live in the study area. We propose to establish a nature reserve for protecting and managing snow leopards in the region. Snow leopard (Uncia uncia) is considered as a unique species because it lives above the snow line, it is endemic to alpines in Central Asia, inhabiting in 12 countries across Central Asia (Fox, 1992). Snow leopard ranges in alpine areas in Qinghai, Xinjiang, Inner Mongolia, Tibet, Gansu and Sichuan in western China (Liao, 1985, 1986; Zhou, 1987; Ma et al., 2002; Jiang & Xu, 2006). The total population and habitat of snow leopards in China are estimated to be 2,000~2,500 individuals and 1,824,316 km2, only 5% of which is under the protection of nature reserves. The cat's current range is fragmented (Zou & Zheng, 2003). Due to strong human persecutions, populations of snow leopards decreased significantly since the end of the 20th century. Thus, the

snow leopards are under the protection of international and domestic laws. From March to May, 2006, we conducted two field surveys in Zhiyu Village, Dulan County in Burhanbuda Mountain, Kunlun Mountains, China to determine the population, distribution and survival status of snow leopards in the area. The aim of the study was to provide ecologic data for snow leopard conservation.
 
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Project funded by International Snow Leopard Trust Small Grants Program. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1068 Serial 493  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Kamelin, R.V. openurl 
  Title Gissar Nature Reserve. The reserves in Middle Asia and Kazakstan Type Book Whole
  Year 1990 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords kazakstan; asia; Gissar; reserves; reserve; park; parks; refuge; protected-area; Kazakhstan; browse; protected area; 2570; Russian  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Moscow Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Russian Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 162 Serial 513  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Khan, A. url  openurl
  Title Snow Leopard Occurrence in Mankial Valley, Swat: Final report Type Report
  Year 2004 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; valley; Report; project; International; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust; program; ecosystem; habitat; species; plants; plant; Animals; Animal; birds; research; action; study; survey; Support; Islt; community; Organization; surveys; winter; information; local; sign; pugmarks; feces; scrapes; scrape; prey; prey species; prey-species; recent; population; markhor; hunting; Culture; Pressure; areas; area; feeding; livestock; burning; decline  
  Abstract Mankial is a sub-valley of the Swat Kohistan. Temperate ecosystem of the valley is intact to a greater extent, which provides habitat to a variety of species of plants, animals and birds. Snow leopard is reported from the valley. To confirm its occurrence, the HUJRA (Holistic Understanding for Justified Research and Action), conducted the study titled “Snow Leopard Survey in Mankial Valley, district Swat, NWFP”. The author provided technical support, while ISLT (The International Snow Leopard Trust) funded the project under its small grants program. The World Wide Fund for Nature-Pakistan (WWF-Pakistan) and the Mankial Community Organization (MCO) facilitated surveys under the project. Surveys revealed that Snow leopard visits parts of the Mankial valley in winter months. Information from the local community shows that Snow leopard remains in the Serai (an off-shoot of the Mankial Valley) from early winter to early spring. Intensive surveys of the prime snow leopard winter habitat in the valley found several snow leopard signs including pugmarks, feces, and scrapes. The study also found occurrence of prey species through indirect evidence though. However, information from the local community confirmed that in the recent past there was a good population of markhor in the valley, which is now reduced to less than 50, mostly due to hunting and habitat disturbance. Hunting is part of the local culture and lifestyle. During winter months hunting pressure is low, as most of the local community migrates to warmer plain areas than Mankial Valley. However, those who live in the area lop oak branches for feeding their livestock and cut trees for burning, in addition to hunting prey species of snow leopard. This has resulted in stunted oak vegetation in most of the lower reaches of the valley and decline of the markhor population.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Project funded by International Snow Leopard Trust Small Grants Program, 2003. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1069 Serial 530  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Khan, A.A. url  openurl
  Title Strategic plan for the conservation of the snow leopard in Pakistan Type Report
  Year 2001 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-17  
  Keywords plan; conservation; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; Pakistan; government; Wwf; International; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher WWF Pakistan & International Snow Leopard Trust Place of Publication Pakistan Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Draft – approved by stakeholders & submitted to government. WWF Pakistan & International Snow Leopard Trust. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1003 Serial 531  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Khatiwada, J.R.; Chalise, M.K.; Kyes, R. url  openurl
  Title Survey of Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia) and Blue Sheep (Pseudois nayaur) populations in the Kangchenjunga Conservation Area (KCA), Nepal. Final report Type Report
  Year 2007 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-13  
  Keywords survey; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; blue; blue sheep; blue-sheep; sheep; Pseudois; pseudois nayaur; Pseudois-nayaur; nayaur; populations; population; conservation; area; Nepal; Report; study; information; management; system; Slims; relative abundance; abundance; transects; transect; length; sign; scrapes; scrape; 20; feces; scent; pugmarks; hairs; Hair; using; livestock; livestock depredation; livestock-depredation; depredation; patterns; herders; herder; snow leopards; snow-leopards; leopards; Animals; Animal  
  Abstract This study was carried out in the Kangchenjunga Conservation Area (KCA), Eastern Nepal from Feb – Nov 2007. We used the Snow Leopard Information Management System, SLIMS (second order survey technique) to determine the relative abundance of snow leopard in the upper part of KCA. Altogether, 36 transects (total length of 15.21 km) were laid down in the major three blocks of KCA. 104 Signs (77 scrapes, 20 feces, 2 Scent mark, 3 Pugmarks and 2 hairs) were recorded. Fixed-point count method was applied for blue sheep from appropriate vantage points. We counted total individual in each herd using 8x42 binocular and 15-60x spotting scope. A total of 43 herds and 1102 individuals were observed in the area. The standard SLIMS questionnaire was conducted to find out relevant information on livestock depredation patterns. Out of 35 households surveyed in KCA, 48% of herders lost livestock due to snow leopards. A total of 21 animals were reportedly lost due to snow leopards from August to September 2007.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Project funded by Snow Leopard Network's Snow Leopard Conservation Grant Program. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1070 Serial 533  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Knight, D. url  openurl
  Title Pipeline could ruin Siberian Plateau Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2000 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 4  
  Keywords Russia; siberia; pipeline; environmentalists; endangered-species; browse; endangered; species; 1000  
  Abstract A proposed natural gas pipeline and accompanying road from southern Siberia to China would destroy the ecology of a plateau that is internationally recognized for its abundance of rare and endangered species, warn environmentalists meeting here this week. Known as the Ukok Plateau, this area near the intersection of Mongolia, China, Russia and Kazakhstan provides a critical habitat for one of the least studied predators in the world, the snow leopard, and many other endangered species including the argali mountain sheep, the black stork and the steppe eagle.  
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  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Journal Title: Inter Press Service Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 397 Serial 538  
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