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Author (down) Zverev, M.D. url  openurl
  Title The snow leopard Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1980 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
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  Abstract Alma Ata, “Kainar”.  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Translated by Kathleen Braden Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1228  
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Author (down) Zou, H., Zheng, X. url  openurl
  Title China Snow Leopard Conservation Strategy Investigation and Analysis Type Journal Article
  Year 2003 Publication China Wildlife Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 54-55  
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  Language Chinese Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes Hongfei Zou, Xin Zheng Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1366  
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Author (down) Zong-Yi, W.; Sung, W. url  openurl
  Title Distribution and recent status of the Felidae in China Type Conference Article
  Year 1986 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 201-209  
  Keywords Felidae; China; status; distribution; environment; browse; 910  
  Abstract Thirteen of the 37 existing species of the family Felidae have been recorded in China. These species are widely distributed throughout the country and inhabit a variety of life zones. Over the past several decades, the populations of most species of cats in China have declined due to overharvest and habitat destruction. China has a Protected Wildlife Species List which was initiated in 1962. Some cat species in China are now endangered or may already be extinct while other species or subspecies are threatened. The authors use limited data on the distribution of cats in China to summarize the staus of each species and the problems facing each. Recomendations for new measures to protect cats in China are made.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor D.S.Miller;.D.D.Everett  
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  Notes Title, Monographic: Cats of the World:Biology, Conservation, and Mangement Place of Meeting: Kingsville, Texas Date of Copyright: 1986 Call Number: 86-31185 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 85 Serial 1092  
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Author (down) Zinchenko Yu.K. url  openurl
  Title About characteristic of mammal fauna in the Markakol nature reserve Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1989 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Part. II. Issue Pages 39-41  
  Keywords Kazakhstan; Markakol nature reserve; mammals; snow leopard.; 8830; Russian  
  Abstract 50 mammal species permanently live in the nature reserve. There penetrate snow leopard, wolf, corsac, and wild boar on a relatively regular basis. Moral, roe deer, and elk migrate outside the Markakol depression in winter. Though mentioned in literature as species inhabiting the nature reserve, beaver, stone marten, and dhole are not met there today.  
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  Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Proceedings of All-Union conference on cadastre and fauna counts. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 860 Serial 1091  
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Author (down) Zimina R.P. url  openurl
  Title Biology and biotopical distribution of mammals. Predators. Distribution of mammals by vertical zones Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1964 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 25-27  
  Keywords Kyrgyzstan; Issy-Kul derression; fauna; snow leopard; distribution.; 8820; Russian  
  Abstract Fauna of the Issyk-Kul depression and the surrounding ridges consists of heterogeneous elements different in their ecologic features and origin. In highlands, more common are species of Central Asia's origin (gray marmot, snow leopard, dhole, ibex, argali, etc.). Snow leopard is met in Terskey-Alatau. Each year hunters catch/shoot one to three snow leopards in the Chon-Kizilsu river basin. In the Djeti-Oguz district, up to five eight snow leopards are caught each winter. Snow leopard is also caught/shot in the river basins Chon-Kizilsu, Karabatkak, Ortok, Archtor, Tekeletor, and Shatly.  
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  Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Regularities of vertical distribution of mammals. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 859 Serial 1090  
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Author (down) Ziegelmayer, K. url  openurl
  Title Tourism and Development: Implications for Snow Leopard Conservation in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal Type Magazine Article
  Year Publication Yale F & ES Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 103  
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  Abstract The Annapurna Conservation Area was established in 1986 to manage environmental degradation. Its designation as a “conservation area,” as opposed to a “park,” was based on the World Wildlife Fund’s Integrated Conservation and Development approach. The goal was to maintain positive relations with indigenous people while protecting and conserving the area’s rich natural resources. The indigenous population was allowed to live in the designated area, and was also encouraged to take a partnership role in its management and sustainable development, in conjunction with the Annapurna Conservation Area Project management team. Though the Annapurna Conservation Area Project has achieved notable success in terms of both community development and protected area management, the focus on tourism (the area is Nepal’s most popular trekking destination) as the means to achieve the project’s development goals has led to a neglect of other stated goals, particularly wildlife conservation. The program lacks explicit linkages between wildlife conservation (e.g., the endangered snow leopard (Unica unica)) and community development, for example. This paper describes and analyzes how the project has handled snow leopard conservation. Alternative approaches for snow leopard conservation include coercive enforcement by the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, persuasive environmental education and outreach, agricultural extension assistance, from monetary compensation for livestock killed to monetary rewards for information on snow leopard poaching. I recommend several alternatives to improve snow leopard conservation. First, establish stronger and more formal links between the Annapurna Conservation Area Project and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation. The department has the legal authority to enforce the endangered species policy that protects snow leopards, but no physical presence within the conservation area. Second, agricultural outreach could provide the subsistence pastoralists with direct economic gains while reducing snow leopard depredation of livestock. This alternative fits well with the development philosophy of the Annapurna Conservation Area Project. Third, increase entrance fees, setting aside a portion for snow leopard conservation. This allows tourists, who value the snow leopard positively, to share in the cost of its conservation. Taken together, these alternatives will improve snow leopard conservation while maintaining the spirit and philosophy of the Annapurna Conservation Area Project.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1342  
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Author (down) Zhou, S. url  openurl
  Title On “uncia uncia” and “meng ji” in Shan Hai Jin Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 13 Issue 2 Pages 84-87  
  Keywords Animal; area; areas; China; Chinese; description; environment; fur; habitat; habitats; historical; meng ji; mountain; mountains; native; river; uncia; Uncia-uncia; Uncia uncia  
  Abstract Meng ji is described in Shan Hui Jin (Classic of Mountains and Rivers) as a leopard-like animal adept in hiding with white fur and a patterned forehead. This article makes a comparison between “meng ji” and “uncia uncia” in terms of their shapes, fur colors, natural environments of habitats, habits, characteristics and native areas, and comes to the conclusion that “meng ji” is what we call “uncia uncia” nowadays. The description of “meng ji” in Shan Hui Jin should be the first record of Uncia uncia in the world.  
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  Notes Full text available in ChineseJournal Title: China Historical Materials of Science and Technology Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 869 Serial 1089  
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Author (down) Zhiryakov V.A. url  openurl
  Title Ibex. Rare ungulate species of the Almaty nature reserve and their protection Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1976 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 141-154  
  Keywords Kazakhstan; Almaty nature reserve; ungulates; number; aerial census; goitered gazelle; argali; ibex; predators; wolf; snow leopard; poaching; disturbance.; 8750; Russian  
  Abstract Collected are data on rare ungulates in the Almaty nature reserve in 1968-1973. Since recently the population of goitered gazelle has dropped sharply and is now 20-30 animals per seven ha. The nature reserve shall be expanded in order to protect the animals. Argali inhabits a desert area in the mountains of Greater and Lesser Kalkana. Argali sometimes migrates outside the nature reserve. Ibex inhabits a mountainous part of the nature reserve, its population being 10-13 animals per 1,000 ha. Predators have negligible impact on the ibex population (12.5 percent of deaths), which is preyed on solely by snow leopard and wolf.  
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  Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Rare mammals of the USSR fauna. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 852 Serial 1082  
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Author (down) Zhiryakov V.A. url  openurl
  Title The influence of large predators on wild mammal populations in the Almaty nature reserve Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1979 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 37-39  
  Keywords Kazakhstan; Almaty nature reserve; Animals; predators; snow leopard; wolf; preys.; 8760; Russian  
  Abstract There are following large predators in the Almaty nature reserve: wolf (5-6), snow leopard (single occasions), Turkistan lynx (single occasions), and Tien Shan brown bear (15-20). The share of wild mammals (roe-deer, ibex, wild boar, argali, gazelle, moral, and badger) being eaten by predators is 18.2 percent, about 60 percent of the entire prey falling to the share of wolf.  
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  Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Ecologic fundamentals of protection and sustainable use of predatory mammals. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 853 Serial 1083  
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Author (down) Zhiryakov V.A. url  openurl
  Title The influence of the predators on population trend of the ungulates in the Almaty nature reserve Type Miscellaneous
  Year 1989 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 199-201  
  Keywords Kazakhstan; predators; ungulates; dencity; population trend; snow leopard.; 8770; Russian  
  Abstract The data on predators and ungulates population dynamics in Almaty Nature reserve (Kazakhstan) in 1983-1987s are given. The number of snow leopard is stable (3-5 individuals), the density is 0.06 indi/1000 ha. An insignificant increase of Siberian ibex' number (660 to 700) with density of 36 indi/1000 ha is recorded.  
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  Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: All-Union Conference on cadastre and censusing of the animals. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 854 Serial 1084  
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