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Author Koshkarev, E.
Title (up) The snow leopard in its northeastern range Type Journal Article
Year 1996 Publication Cat News Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue Pages 10
Keywords Russia; Panthera-uncia; home-range; distribution; endangered; threatened-species; Sayan; Zhombok-river -basin; browse; home range; home; range; threatened; species; zhombok river basin; zhombok; river; basin; panthera uncia; panthera; uncia; 680
Abstract The author surveyed three sites in the central and eastern Sayan regions of Russia for snow leopards. In the Zhombolok River Basin of the Kropotkinskiy and Okinskiy Mountains, the author found seven snow leopard tracks, representing five or six individuals. In the Munku-Sardyk Peak area, one snow leopard track was found, and in the Tunkinskiy Ranffe area three tracks, representing at least two animals, were found. Other information is provided on local sightings. klf
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Notes AUTHOR ADDRESS: Inst. Biol., Irkutsk Univ., Russia Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 286 Serial 563
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Author Schaller, G.B.; Hong, L.; Talipu, J.; Mingjiang, R.Q.
Title (up) The Snow Leopard in Xinjiang, China Type Miscellaneous
Year 1989 Publication Snow Line Abbreviated Journal
Volume winter Issue Pages
Keywords surveys; research; Tian-Shan; scrapes; sign; range; browse; 4780
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Publisher Islt Place of Publication Seattle Editor
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Notes Full Text at URLJournal Title: Snow Line Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 465 Serial 869
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Author Kashkarov, E.
Title (up) THE SNOW LEOPARD OF KIRGIZIA: NATIONAL SHAME OR NATIONAL PRIDE Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 239-253
Keywords snow leopard, irbis, ibex, mountain sheep, conservation, range, reserve, monitoring, cameratrap, Sarychat, Kirgizia, Central Asia.
Abstract Article examines the problems existing in conservation of the snow leopard in Kirgizia after break-up of the

USSR. Unfortunate situation is common to most of the 14 countries in the snow leopard range, but seems

especially sharp to Kirgizia. Yet half of the century ago Kirgizia has had about 1.5 thousand of the snow

leopards, and today there remains no more than 1/10. In Soviet time Kirgizia was a global supplier of the

snow leopards for the zoo-export � to create a reserve number of endangered cats in captivity. Today, at

least half of the snow leopards in the Zoos of the world are individuals, caught in Kirgizia or their

descendants.

Since independence, Kirgizia has set new records. In Sarychat-Irtash reserve � the best for the snow

leopard in Central Asia, and probably in the whole range � this species was completely destroyed after 3

years of reserve opening... and 17 years later � revived... Situation comes presently back to the worst-case

scenario, and not only for the snow leopard. Author shows how work in this direction social and economic

levers, and what kind future he would like to see in Kirgizia, where he lived for 12 years and was at the

forefront of pioneering research of the snow leopard and its conservation.
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Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1454
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Author Poyarkov, A.D.; Subbotin, A.E.
Title (up) The Snow Leopard Status in Russia Type Conference Article
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords snow; leopard; status; uncia; Russia; range; habitat; population; 5050
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Notes Title, Monographic: Proceedings of the Snow Leopard Survival SummitPlace of Meeting: Seattle,WA Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 491 Serial 789
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Author The Snow Leopard Conservancy
Title (up) Visitor Attitude and Market Survey for Planning Community-based Tourism Initiatives in Rural Ladakh Type Report
Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume SLC Field Series Document No. 2. Issue Pages
Keywords attitude; survey; planning; community-based; tourism; rural; Ladakh; mountain; range; Himalaya; Karakoram; land; landscapes; landscape; gorge; home; wildlife; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; blue; blue sheep; blue-sheep; sheep; tibetan; Tibetan wild ass; wild; wild ass; wild-ass; High; desert; ecosystem; International; domestic; environment; people; conserve; resource; income; Snow Leopard Conservancy; local; community; Organization; co-existence; predators; predator; endangered; reducing; livestock; livestock depredation; livestock-depredation; depredation; loss
Abstract Bounded by two of the world's highest mountain ranges, the Great Himalaya and the Karakoram, Ladakh is a land of exhilarating mountain landscapes, rocky gorges and a unique cultural heritage. It is also home to distinctive wildlife such as the snow leopard, blue sheep and Tibetan wild ass, all living in a unique high altitude desert ecosystem. Not surprisingly, Ladakh is becoming a sought after tourist destination for international and domestic visitors alike. Over the past two decades tourism has grown substantially, although erratically, with both positive and less positive results for Ladakh's environment and people. People are recognizing that it is important to act now and engage in an informed dialogue in order to conserve the natural and cultural resources on which the future of tourism and related incomes depend. The Snow Leopard Conservancy (SLC) is working in collaboration with local communities and nongovernmental organizations to foster co-existence between people and predators like the endangered snow leopard by reducing livestock depredation losses and improving household incomes in environmentally friendly, socially responsible and economically viable ways. Well-balanced tourism is one income generating option.
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Publisher Place of Publication Los Gatos, California Editor
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Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1023 Serial 960
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Author Sunquist, F.
Title (up) Where cats and herders mix. (snow leopards in Tibet and Mongolia) Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication International Wildlife Abbreviated Journal
Volume 27 Issue 1 Pages 27-33
Keywords Mongolia; Tibet; herder; livestock; snow-leopard; predator; prey; World-Wildlife-Foundation; habitat; reserve; park; refuge; Pakistan; China; herders; parks; protected-area; snow leopard; browse; Wwf; world wildlife foundation; 1110; snow; leopard; range; territory; central; Central Asia; asia; Animal; region; conservation; wildlife; foundation; border; sheep; Baltistan; enclosures; area; home; snow leopards; snow-leopards; leopards; countries; country; Feed; Cats; cat; mountain; peoples; people
Abstract The snow leopard inhabits a huge range of territory which encompasses some of Central Asia's most bleak and inhospitable terrains. The animal herders in these regions are desperately poor and yet they have agreed to cooperate with conservation groups in protecting the snow leopard. The World Wildlife Foundation has worked to create a refuge on the Pakistan-China border. Sheep herders near Askole, a village in the Baltistan region of northern Paksitan, drive their flocks past stone enclosures. The area is also home to snow leopards. With their natural prey dminished, leopards in 13 countries of central Asia occasionally feed on livestock, putting the cats on a collision course with mountain peoples.
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Notes COPYRIGHT 1997 National Wildlife Federation , Jan-Feb 1997 v27 n1 p26(8) Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 330 Serial 950
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Author Shrestha, R.; Wegge, P.
Title (up) Wild sheep and livestock in Nepal Trans-Himalaya: coexistence or competition? Type Journal Article
Year 2008 Publication Environmental Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 32 Issue 2 Pages 125-136
Keywords bharal; blue sheep; diet; food habits; mountain ungulates; Nepal; pastoralism; pseudois nayaur; rangeland management; resource partitioning
Abstract Excessive grazing by livestock is claimed to displace wild ungulates in the Trans-Himalaya. This study compares the seasonal diets and habitat use of sympatric wild naur Pseudois nayaur and domestic goat Capra hircus, sheep Ovis aries and free-ranging yak Bos grunniens in north Nepal and analyses their overlap both within and across seasons. Alpinemeadow and the legumes Oxytropis and Chesneya were critical resources for all animal groups. High overlap occurred cross-seasonally when smallstock (sheep and goats) in summer used the spring and autumn ranges of naur. Relatively high total ungulate biomass (3028 kg km-2) and low recruitment of naur (56 young per 100 adult females in autumn) suggested interspecific competition. The spatio-temporal heterogeneity in composition and phenology of food plants across the steep gradient of altitude, together with rotational grazing, appears to indirectly facilitate coexistence of naur and smallstock. However, owing to high crossseasonal (inter-seasonal) overlaps, competition is likely to occur between these two groups at high stocking densities. Within seasons, naur overlapped more with free-ranging yak than with smallstock. As their habitat use and diets were most similar in winter, when both fed extensively on the same species of shrubs, naur was most likely to compete with yak during that season.




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Call Number SLN @ rana @ 936 Serial 890
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Author Oli, M.K.
Title (up) Winter home range of snow leopards in Nepal Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication Mammalia Abbreviated Journal
Volume 61 Issue 3 Pages 355-360
Keywords homerange; winter; Nepal; Uncia uncia; densities; distribution; habitat; browse; uncia; home-range; home; range; 600
Abstract Because of their low densities, sparse distribution, elusive behavior, and the precipitous habitat they occupy, snow leopards (Uncia uncia) have been the subject of limited study. This study contributes to that limited database with an investigation of the winter home range of 3 radio-collared snow leopards (2 females and 1 male) in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal. Winter home ranges varied from 13.9-22.3 km2 (x = 19.1). Home ranges overlapped extensively within and between sexes, and an area of 8.1 km2 in the core study site was shared by all three leopards.
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Notes Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 323 Serial 752
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