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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title Winter home range of snow leopards in Nepal Type Journal Article
  Year 1997 Publication Mammalia Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 61 Issue 3 Pages 355-360  
  Keywords homerange; winter; Nepal; Uncia uncia; densities; distribution; habitat; browse; uncia; home-range; home; range; 600  
  Abstract Because of their low densities, sparse distribution, elusive behavior, and the precipitous habitat they occupy, snow leopards (Uncia uncia) have been the subject of limited study. This study contributes to that limited database with an investigation of the winter home range of 3 radio-collared snow leopards (2 females and 1 male) in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal. Winter home ranges varied from 13.9-22.3 km2 (x = 19.1). Home ranges overlapped extensively within and between sexes, and an area of 8.1 km2 in the core study site was shared by all three leopards.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 323 Serial 752  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title Seasonal patterns in habitat use of blue sheep Pseudois nayaur (Artiodactyla, Bovidae) in Nepal Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Mammalia Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 60 Issue 2 Pages 187-193  
  Keywords blue-sheep; snow-leopard; Panthera-uncia; Nepal; conservation; prey; predator; snow leopard; blue; sheep; browse; panthera; uncia; 670  
  Abstract Blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) are the main prey of the endangered snow leopard (Panthera uncia) as well as an important game species in Nepal. A knowledge of how blue sheep utilize their habitat is essential for the scientific management of the sheep and for the conservation of the snow leopard, but we only have a limited understanding of this aspect of blue sheep ecology. I studied the habitat use pattern of blue sheep by direct observation in the Anna-purna Conservation Area, Nepal where they occur sympatrically with the snow leopard. The sheep used grassland habitats more frequently during pre-parturition (spring) and post-parturition (autumn) than other habitat types, but scrub and grassland habitats were used equally frequently during the rut (winter). The sheep used smooth undulating slopes of medium steepness (<40 degrees) on southerly aspects within the elevation range of 4,200-4,600 m most frequently in all seasons, and there was no evidence of seasonal migration along the elevation gradient. When not in broken landforms (e.g., cliff, landslides), the sheep maintained proximity (less than or equal to 150 m) to such features suggesting their importance as escape cover (i.e., from predators). The use of habitat components by blue sheep appeared to be related to the distribution of foraging areas and escape cover.  
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  Notes UNIV EDINBURGH,INST CELL ANIM & POPULAT BIOL,EDINBURGH EH9 3JT,MIDLOTHIAN,SCOTLANDANNAPURNA CONSERVAT AREA PROJECT,KATMANDU,NEPAL /Publisher:MUSEUM NAT HIST NATURELLE, PARIS Document Type: English Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 289 Serial 751  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title The Snow Leopard Dilema: Will they Persist Type Conference Article
  Year 1995 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 433-441  
  Keywords asia; Uncia-uncia; conservation; snow-leopard; protection; fur; medicine; livestock; predation; habitat; uncia; snow; leopard; snow leopard; browse; 920  
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  Notes Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Mississippi State University, Box 9690, Mississippi State, MS 39762 Title, Monographic: 1995 AZA Regional Conference Proceedings Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 274 Serial 749  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title Snow leopards and local human population in a protected area: a case study from the Nepalese Himalaya Type Conference Article
  Year 1994 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 51-64  
  Keywords Nepal; Himalaya; herders; herder; livestock; conservation; annapurna; protected-area; park; parks; reserve; refuge; blue-sheep; predator; prey; habitat; radio-tracking; diet; scat; feces; fecal; marmot; Manang; poaching; hunting; pelts; skins; furs; coats; grazing; burning; trekking; tourism; education; religion; blue; sheep; browse; protected; area; protected area; radio tracking; radio; tracking; annapurna conservation area; Annapurna-Conservation-Area; 2110  
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  Publisher International Snow Leopard Trust, Seattle, Washington Place of Publication Usa Editor J.L.Fox; D.Jizeng  
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  Notes Full Text at URLTitle, Monographic: Proceedings of the Seventh International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: ChinaDate of Copyright: 1994 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 240 Serial 748  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title Snow leopards and blue sheep in Nepal: Densities and predator: prey ratio Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Journal of Mammalogy Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 75 Issue 4 Pages 998-1004  
  Keywords Nepal; blue-sheep; prey; livestock; predation; blue; sheep; browse; 740; snow; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; leopard; blue sheep; densities; density; predator  
  Abstract I studied snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) in Manang District, Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal, to estimate numbers and analyze predator-prey interactions. Five to seven adult leopards used the 10-5-km-2 study area, a density of 4.8 to 6.7 leopards/100 km-2. Density of blue sheep was 6.6 10.2 sheep/km-2, and biomass density was 304 kg/km-2. Estimated relative biomass consumed by snow leopards suggested that blue sheep were the most important prey; marmots (Marmota himalayana) also contributed significantly to the diel of snow leopards Snow leopards in Manang were estimated to harvest 9-20% of total biomass and 11-24% of total number of blue sheep annually. Snow leopard: blue sheep ratio was 1:114-1:159 on a weight basis, which was considered sustainable given the importance of small mammals in the leopard's diet and the absence of other competing predators.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Call Number: 599.05 JO Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 236 Serial 746  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title A key for the identification of the hair of mammals of a snow leopard (Panthera uncia) habitat in Nepal Type Journal Article
  Year 1993 Publication Journal of Zoology London Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 231 Issue 1 Pages 71-93  
  Keywords Nepal; snow leopard; scats; Hair; diet; identification; Panthera-uncia; browse; panthera uncia; panthera; uncia; 780  
  Abstract Analysis of prey remains in scats, particularly hairs, in widely used to study diet of mammalian predators, but identification of hair is often difficult because hair structures vary considerably both within and between species. Use of photographic reference of diagnostically important hair structures from mammals occurring in a predator's habitat has been found to be convenient for routine identification. A photographic reference key was developed for the identification of hairs of the mammals known to occur in a snow leopard (Panthera uncia) habitat in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal. The key included a photographic reference of the diagnostic hair structures of nine species of wild and five species of domestic mammals. The cross-sectional appearance, shape and arrangement of medulla, the ratio of cortex to medulla, and the form and distribution of pigment in medulla and cortex were important diagnostic aids in the identification of hairs.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Call Number: QL1 .J879 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 207 Serial 745  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title The ecology and conservation of the snow leopard (Panthera uncia) in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal Type Book Whole
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages  
  Keywords annapurna; conservation; area; Annapurna-Conservation-Area; ecology; Nepal; parks; park; reserves; reserve; refuge; potected-area; protected; browse; 2390  
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  Corporate Author Thesis Ph.D. thesis  
  Publisher University of Edinburgh, Scotland. Place of Publication Editor  
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  Notes Phil. thesis Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 183 Serial 742  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K. url 
  Title Ecology and conservation of snow leopard project Type Report
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6628 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords 1990; conservation; ecology; Report; snow leopard; Wwf  
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  Notes WWF Project #6628: progress report 2 for the period December 1990 – March 1991. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 984 Serial 743  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K.; Rogers, E.M. url 
  Title Seasonal pattern in group size and population composition of blue sheep in Manang, Nepal Type Journal Article
  Year 1996 Publication Journal of Wildlife Management Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 60 Issue 4 Pages 797-801  
  Keywords prey; snow leopard; panthera uncia; Nepal; annapurna conservation area; predator; blue; sheep; browse; Panthera-uncia; panthera; uncia; Annapurna-Conservation-Area; annapurna; conservation; area; 650  
  Abstract Blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) are the principal prey of the endangered snow leopard (Panthera uncia) in the Himalayas and adjacent ranges. We studied group size and population composition of blue sheep in Manang District, Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal. Overall mean group size was 15.6 (SE = 1.3), but it varied seasonally (P lt 0.001), with significantly smaller groups in winter than in other seasons. Mixed groups were most numerous in all seasons, and there was no evidence of sexual segregation. Yearling sex ratio (93.7 M:100 F) did not vary seasonally, nor did the ratio deviate from parity. Adult sex ratio showed a seasonal pattern favoring males post-parturition but female-biased during the rut and pre-parturition. Seasonal variation in sex-specific mortality is offered as a plausible explanation for the observed pattern in adult sex ratio.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Call Number: 639.105 JO Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 288 Serial 750  
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Author (up) Oli, M.K.; Taylor, I.R.; Rogers, M.E. url 
  Title Snow leopard Panthera unica predation of livestock: An assessment of local perceptions in the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal Type Journal Article
  Year 1994 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 68 Issue 1 Pages 63-68  
  Keywords predation; livestock; herders; goat; sheep; oxen; horse; Panthera-uncia; Nepal; snow-leopard; Annapurna-Conservation-Area; public attitudes; snow leopard; browse; panthera uncia; uncia; panthera; annapurna conservation area; annapurna; conservation; area; public; attitudes; 750  
  Abstract Public attitudes towards snow leopard Panthera uncia predation of domestic livestock were investigated by a questionnaire survey of four villages in snow leopard habitat within the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal. Most local inhabitants were subsistence farmers, many dependent upon yaks, oxen, horses and goats, with an average livestock holding of 26.6 animals per household. Reported losses to snow leopards averaged 0.6 and 0.7 animals per household in two years of study, constituting 2.6% of total stockholding but representing in monetary terms almost a quarter of the average annual Nepali national per capita income. Local people held strongly negative attitudes towards snow leopards and most suggested that total extermination of leopards was the only acceptable solution to the predation problem. Snow leopards were reported to be killed by herdsmen in defence of their livestock. The long-term success of snow leopard conservation programmes may depend upon the satisfactory resolution of the predation conflict. Some possible ways of reducing predation losses are also discussed.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Call Number: S900 .B5 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 237 Serial 747  
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