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Author (up) Ale, S., Shrestha, B., and Jackson, R.
Title On the status of Snow Leopard Panthera Uncia (Schreber 1775) in Annapurna, Nepal Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Threatened Taxa Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 6(3) Pages 5534-5543
Keywords Annapurna, Blue Sheep, Buddhism, camera-trapping, Himalayas, Mustang, sign-survey, Snow Leopard.
Abstract
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1407
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Author (up) Ferretti, F., Lovari, S., Minder, I., Pellizzi, B.
Title Recovery of the snow leopard in Sagarmatha (Mt.Everest) National Park: effects on main prey Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication European Journal of Wildlife Research Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 60 Pages 559-562
Keywords Predator–prey relationships . Small populations . Snow leopard . Himalayan tahr
Abstract Consequences of predation may be particularly

heavy on small populations of herbivores, especially if they

are threatened with extinction. Over the 2006–2010 period, we

documented the effects of the spontaneous return of the endangered

snow leopard on the population of the vulnerable

Himalayan tahr. The study area was an area of central

Himalaya where this cat disappeared c. 40 years before, because

of persecution by man. Snow leopards occurred mainly

in areas close to the core area of tahr distribution. Tahr was the

staple (56.3 %) of snow leopards. After the arrival of this cat,

tahr decreased by more than 2/3 from 2003 to 2010 (mainly

through predation on kids). Subsequently, the density of snow

leopards decreased by 60%from2007 to 2010. The main prey

of snow leopards in Asia (bharal, marmots) were absent in our

study area, forcing snow leopards to specialize on tahr. The

restoration of a complete prey spectrum should be favoured

through reintroductions, to conserve large carnivores and to

reduce exploitation of small populations of herbivores, especially

if threatened.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1408
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Author (up) Janecka, J. E., Jackson, R., Munkhtsog, B., Murphy, W. J.
Title Characterization of 9 microsatellites and primers in snow leopards and a species-specific PCR assay for identifying noninvasive samples Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Conservation Genetic Resource Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages 369:373
Keywords Microsatellites,Cytochrome b, Snow Leopard, Noninvasive genetics, Individual identification
Abstract Molecular markers that can effectively identify noninvasively collected samples and provide genetic

information are critical for understanding the distribution, status, and ecology of snow leopards (Panthera uncia). However, the low DNA quantity and quality in many

noninvasive samples such as scats makes PCR amplification and genotyping challenging. We therefore designed primers for 9 microsatellites loci previously isolated in the

domestic cat (Felis catus) specifically for snow leopard studies using noninvasive samples. The loci showed moderate levels of variation in two Mongolian snow leopard

populations. Combined with seven other loci that we previously described, they have sufficient variation (He = 0.504, An = 3.6) for individual identification and

population structure analysis. We designed a species species specific PCR assay using cytochrome b for identification of unknown snow leopard samples. These molecular markers

facilitate in depth studies to assess distribution, abundance, population structure, and landscape connectivity of this endangered species.

endangered species
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1427
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Author (up) Janecka, J. E., Jackson, R., Munkhtsog, B., Murphy, W. J.
Title Characterization of 9 microsatellites and primers in snow leopards and a species-specific PCR assay for identifying noninvasive samples Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Conservation Genetic Resource Abbreviated Journal
Volume 6 Issue 2 Pages 369:373
Keywords Microsatellites,Cytochrome b, Snow Leopard, Noninvasive genetics, Individual identification
Abstract Molecular markers that can effectively identify noninvasively collected samples and provide genetic

information are critical for understanding the distribution, status, and ecology of snow leopards (Panthera uncia). However, the low DNA quantity and quality in many

noninvasive samples such as scats makes PCR amplification and genotyping challenging. We therefore designed primers for 9 microsatellites loci previously isolated in the

domestic cat (Felis catus) specifically for snow leopard studies using noninvasive samples. The loci showed moderate levels of variation in two Mongolian snow leopard

populations. Combined with seven other loci that we previously described, they have sufficient variation (He = 0.504, An = 3.6) for individual identification and

population structure analysis. We designed a species species specific PCR assay using cytochrome b for identification of unknown snow leopard samples. These molecular markers

facilitate in depth studies to assess distribution, abundance, population structure, and landscape connectivity of this endangered species.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1428
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Author (up) Khan, B., Ablimit, A., Nawaz, M. A., Ali, R., Khan, M. Z., Jaffaruddin, Karim, R.
Title Pastoralist experience and tolerance of snow leopard, wolf and lynx predation in Karakoram Pamir Mountains Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Journal of Biodiversity and Envirnomental Sciences Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 4 Pages 214-229
Keywords Carnivore, herbivores, interaction, Karakoram, Pamir, Khunjerab, Taxkorgan, China, Pakistan
Abstract Human-carnivore conflict is a common conservation and livelihood issue in mountain communities. This study was conducted to understand nature and extent of socio-ecological interaction between pastoralism and wildlife conservation in cold deserts of Karakoram Pamir Mountains (KPM) between China and Pakistan. Study revealed that livestock depredation is a burning issue in KPM with varying intensity from place to place, depending upon wild prey abundance, herd size, herding practices, predator type and age. Snow leopard, wolf and lynx were the major predators, while Brown bear despite its presence was reported being less fatal to livestock. Snow leopard killed highest number of animals (88.7% n=1440) mostly sheep and goats whereas, wolf killed more juvenile yaks. Lynx was found occasionally predating on young domestic crop. Highest number of kills was recorded from pastures during summer months (July-Aug) when animals were free grazing or were kept inside pens at night. Wild prey base being abysmally low, livestock seemed offering a considerable portion of diet to carnivores. Despite considerable losses from carnivores, more respondents in KNP (Pakistan) buffer zone had sympathies for predators compared to those in TNR (China) who were annoyed of the carnivores. Although people attributed escalating human-carnivore conflict to a higher level of protection to wild animals in Protected Areas (PA) but efforts are still needed to judiciously integrate conservation with local livelihood and development needs, otherwise herders may continue losing their livestock to predators and retaliatory killing of endangered carnivore species i.e., Snow leopard and Wolf may continue unabated and would further destabilize the fragile mountain ecosystem.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1418
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Author (up) Kohli, K., Sankaran, M., Suryawanshi, K. R., Mishra, C
Title A penny saved is a penny earned: lean season foraging strategy of an alpine ungulate Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 92 Pages 93-100
Keywords blue sheep, grazing, herbivore, mountain ungulate, optimal foraging, Pseudois nayaur, trans-Himalaya
Abstract Lean season foraging strategies are critical for the survival of species inhabiting highly seasonal environments

such as alpine regions. However, inferring foraging strategies is often difficult because of

challenges associated with empirically estimating energetic costs and gains of foraging in the field. We

generated qualitative predictions for the relationship between daily winter foraging time, body size and

forage availability for three contrasting foraging strategies including time minimization, energy intake

maximization and net energy maximization. Our model predicts that for animals employing a time

minimization strategy, daily winter foraging time should not change with body size and should increase

with a reduction in forage availability. For energy intake maximization, foraging time should not vary

with either body size or forage availability. In contrast, for a net energy maximization strategy, foraging

time should decrease with increase in body size and with a reduction in forage availability. We contrasted

proportion of daily time spent foraging by bharal, Pseudois nayaur, a dimorphic grazer, across

different body size classes in two high-altitude sites differing in forage availability. Our results indicate

that bharal behave as net energy maximizers during winter. As predicted by the net energy maximization

strategy, daily winter foraging time of bharal declined with increasing body size, and was lower in the

site with low forage availability. Furthermore, as predicted by our model, foraging time declined as the

winter season progressed. We did not find support for the time minimizing or energy intake maximizing

strategies. Our qualitative model uses relative rather than absolute costs and gains of foraging which are

often difficult to estimate in the field. It thus offers a simple way to make informed inferences regarding

animal foraging strategies by contrasting estimates of daily foraging time across gradients of body size

and forage availability.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1409
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard poaching and trade in China 2000-2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone, Pelt, Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1410
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard poaching and trade in China 2000-2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone, Pelt,Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1411
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard poaching and trade in China 2000- 2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone Pelt, Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.


Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1412
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard Poaching and Trade in China 2000-2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone, Pelt, Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.


Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1414
Permanent link to this record