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Author (up) Ale, S.; Whelan, C. url  openurl
  Title Reappraisal of the role of big, fierce predators Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2008 Publication Biodiversity Conservation Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 685-690  
  Keywords Biodiversity ú Conservation ú Costs of predation ú Indirect effects ú Non-lethal effects ú Predators ú Top-down control; big; predators; predator  
  Abstract The suggestion in the early 20th century that top predators were a necessary component of ecosystems because they hold herbivore populations in check and promote biodiversity was at Wrst accepted and then largely rejected. With the advent of Evolutionary Ecology and a more full appreciation of direct and indirect effects of top predators, this role of top predators is again gaining acceptance. The previous views were predicated upon lethal effects of predators but largely overlooked their non-lethal effects. We suggest that

conceptual advances coupled with an increased use of experiments have convincingly demonstrated that prey experience costs that transcend the obvious cost of death. Prey species use adaptive behaviours to avoid predators, and these behaviours are not cost-free. With predation risk, prey species greatly restrict their use of available habitats and consumption of available food resources. Effects of top predators consequently cascade down to the trophic levels below them. Top predators, the biggies, are thus both the targets of and the means for conservation at the landscape scale.
 
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  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 885 Serial 52  
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Author (up) Anonymous url  openurl
  Title The Project Snow Leopard Type Report
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-68  
  Keywords  
  Abstract GOAL: To safeguard and conserve India’s unique natural heritage of high altitude wildlife populations and their habitats by promoting conservation through participatory policies and actions.

DRAFTED BY: Project Snow Leopard Committee instituted by the Ministry of Environment and Forests, Government of India, (vide Notification No. F.No., 15 5/2006 WL I, Dated 31 July 2006) (Annexure 1).

LOCATION: All biologically important landscapes in the Himalayan high altitudes in the states of Jammu & Kashmir, Himachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Sikkim, and Arunachal Pradesh.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, New Delhi Thesis  
  Publisher Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India Place of Publication Dehradun, India Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Published by the Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, 2008 by the Wildlife Institute of India, Dehradun. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1095  
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Author (up) Bhatnagar, Y.V. url  openurl
  Title Relocation from wildlife reserves in the Greater and Trans-Himalayas: Is it necessary? Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2008 Publication Conservation and Society Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 6 Issue 3 Pages 263-270  
  Keywords wildlife reserves,relocation,Greater Himalayas,Trans-Himalayas; wildlife; reserves; relocation; Himalayas; Himalaya; trans-himalaya; transhimalaya  
  Abstract The Greater and Trans-Himalayan tracts are cold deserts that have severe seasonal and resource scarce environments. Covering the bulk of Indian Himalayas, they are a rich repository of biodiversity values and ecosystem services. The region has a large protected area (PA) network which has not been completely effective in conserving these unique values. The human population densities are much lower (usually < 1 per sq km) than in most other parts of the country (over 300 to a sq km). However, even such small populations can come into conflict with strict PA laws that demand large inviolate areas, which can mainly be achieved through relocation of the scattered settlements. In this paper, I reason that in this landscape relocation is not a tenable strategy for conservation due to a variety of reasons. The primary ones are that wildlife, including highly endangered ones are pervasive in the larger landscape (unlike the habitat 'islands' of the forested ecosystems) and existing large PAs usually encompass only a small proportion of this range. Similarly, traditional use by people for marginal cultivation, biomass extraction and pastoralism is also as pervasive in this landscape. There does exist pockets of conflict and these are probably increasing owing to a variety of changes relating to modernisation. However, scarce resources, the lack of alternatives and the traditional practice of clear-cut division of all usable areas and pastures between communities make resettlement of people outside PAs extremely difficult. It is reasoned that given the widespread nature of the wildlife and pockets of relatively high density, it is important to prioritise these smaller areas for conservation in a scenario where they form a mosaic of small 'cores' that are more effectively maintained with local support and that enable wildlife to persist. These ideas have recently gained widespread acceptance in both government and conservation circles and may soon become part of national strategy for these areas.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 914 Serial 138  
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Author (up) Blomqvist, L. url  openurl
  Title International Pedigree Book for Snow Leopards, Uncia uncia Type Book Whole
  Year 2008 Publication International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue 9 Pages 1-175  
  Keywords International; pedigree; snow; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; leopard; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; zoo; 4600; studbook  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Helsinki Zoo Place of Publication Helsinki Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Helsinki Zoo, P.O. Box 4600, FIN 00099. Blomqvist is the international studbook keeper and EEP coordinator for snow leopards. leif.blomqvist@hel.fi Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1006 Serial 173  
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Author (up) Blomqvist, L. url  openurl
  Title The status of the snow leopard in the EEP – program in 2007 Type Book Chapter
  Year 2008 Publication International Pedigree Book of Snow Leopards Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 9 Issue 4 Pages 20-24  
  Keywords status; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; program; International; pedigree; snow leopards; snow-leopards; leopards  
  Abstract  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Helsinki Zoo Place of Publication Helsinki Editor Blomqvist, L.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1007 Serial 174  
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Author (up) Broder, J.; MacFadden, A.; Cosens, L.; Rosenstein, D.; Harrison, T. url  openurl
  Title Use of Positive Reinforcement Conditioning to Monitor Pregnancy in an Unanesthetized Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia) via Transabdominal Ultrasound Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2008 Publication Zoo Biology Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 27 Issue Pages 78-85  
  Keywords desensitization; fetal development; operant conditioning; pregnancy detection; primiparous; snow leopard; zoo  
  Abstract Closely monitoring snow leopard (Uncia uncia) fetal developments via transabdominal ultrasound, with minimal stress to the animal, was the goal of this project. The staff at Potter Park Zoo has used the principles of habituation, desensitization, and positive reinforcement to train a female snow leopard (U. uncia). Ultrasound examinations were preformed on an unanesthetized feline at 63 and 84 days. The animal remained calm and compliant throughout both procedures. Fetuses were observed and measured on both occasions. The absence of anesthesia eliminated components of psychologic and physiologic stress associated with sedation. This was the first recorded instance of transabdominal ultrasound being carried out on an unanesthetized snow leopard. It documents the feasibility of detecting pregnancy and monitoring fetal development via ultrasound.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 905 Serial 196  
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Author (up) Burgener, N.; Gusset, M.; Schmid, H. url  openurl
  Title Frustrated appetitive foraging behavior, stereotypic pacing, and fecal glucocorticoid levels in snow leopards (Uncia uncia) in the Zurich Zoo Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2008 Publication Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 11 Issue Pages 74-83  
  Keywords behavior; captive; fecal; feeding strategy; physiological; snow leopard; zoo  
  Abstract This study hypothesized that permanently frustrated, appetitive-foraging behavior caused the stereotypic pacing regularly observed in captive carnivores. Using 2 adult female snow leopards (Uncia uncia), solitarily housed in the Zurich Zoo, the study tested this hypothesis experimentally with a novel feeding method: electronically controlled, time-regulated feeding boxes. The expected result of employing this active foraging device as a successful coping strategy was reduced behavioral and physiological measures of stress, compared with a control-feeding regime without feeding boxes. The study assessed this through behavioral observations and by evaluating glucocorticoid levels noninvasively from feces. Results indicated that the 2 snow leopards did not perform successful coping behavior through exercising active foraging behavior or through displaying the stereotypic pacing. The data support a possible explanation: The box-feeding method did not provide the 2 snow leopards with the external stimuli to satisfy their appetitive behavioral needs. Moreover, numerous other factors not necessarily or exclusively related to appetitive behavior could have caused and influenced the stereotypic pacing.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 915 Serial 202  
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Author (up) Chadwick, D.H. url  openurl
  Title Out of the Shadows: The elusive Central Asian snow leopard steps into a Type Magazine Article
  Year 2008 Publication National geographic Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 213 Issue 6 Pages 106-129  
  Keywords conservation, research, snow leopard, Uncia uncia  
  Abstract The elusive Central Asian snow leopard steps into a risk-filled future.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author National Geographic Society Thesis  
  Publisher National Geographic Society Place of Publication Washington, D.C. Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1113  
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Author (up) Chalise, M.K. url  openurl
  Title Nepalka Samrakshit Banyajantu (Nepal's Protected Wildlife in Nepali language) Type Book Whole
  Year 2008 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 106-108  
  Keywords government; language; leopard; leopards; Nepal; protected; snow; snow-leopard; snow-leopards; snow leopard; snow leopards; wildlife  
  Abstract  
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  Publisher Shajha Prakashan Place of Publication Lalitpur, Kathmandu Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  Notes In Nepalese language only. Includes only the chapter on snow leopards and the book cover. The book is published by a government corporate house of publication. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1058 Serial 211  
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Author (up) Chalise, M.K. url  openurl
  Title Wild Fauna around the Himalayan Wetlands Type Book Chapter
  Year 2008 Publication Water Tower of Asia: Experiences in Wetland Conservation in Nepal Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 104-108  
  Keywords  
  Abstract The Himalayan mountain range extends in a broad arc from Pakistan through India, Nepal, Bhutan and China. With elevations ranging from approximately 300 meters in the plains at the base of the mountains to the peaks well over 8,000 meters (Mt Everest 8,848 m). The Himalaya is the tallest and most complex of the world mountain regions (Striffler, 1985). The Himalaya can be divided into three physiographic zones. These includes the lower foothills usually describe as sub-Himalaya and represented by the Siwalik Hills which extend along most of the Himalaya with elevation seldom exceeding 1000 m. The second zone is the middle Himalaya also called Outer Himalaya or the lesser Himalaya with elevation ranges from 600 meters to over 3000 m. Interspersed within the middle zone are occasional larger to small valleys and river basins. The third zone is the great Himalaya or Inner Himalaya zone that covers higher mountain areas, the snow clad peaks and trans-Himalayan harsh climatic dry areas (HMG Nepal, 1977; Kaith, 1960). The glaciers and natural springs have drained the whole area and created a vast area as wetlands supplemented by different lake system in different elevations.  
  Address  
  Corporate Author Changwon, Ramsar Environmental Foundation Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication South Korea Editor Bhandari B.B., Seungh, O. S. & Sung-Hoon, W.  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Bhandari B.B., Seungh, O. S. and Sung-Hoon W (eds) Water Tower of Asia: Experiences in Wetland Conservation in Nepal. Changwon, Ramsar Environmental Foundation, South Korea. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1320  
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