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Author Johansson, Torbjorn, A. Johansson, Orjan. McCarthy, Tom url  openurl
  Title An Automatic VHF Transmitter Monitoring System for Wildlife Research Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication Wildlife Society Bulletin Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 9999 Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords automatic system, monitoring, pulse detection, trap-site transmitter, VHF transmitter monitoring  
  Abstract We describe an automated system for monitoring multiple very high frequency (VHF) transmitters, which are commonly employed in wildlife studies. The system consists of a microprocessor-controlled radio-frequency monitor equipped with advanced signal-processing capabilities that communicates with, and relays information to, a user interface unit at a different location. the system was designed for a capture-and-release snow leopard (Panthera uncia) study in Mongolia, where checking trap-site transmitters manually entailed climbing a hill with telemetry equipment several times each day and night. Here, it monitors the trap-site transmitters and actively produces an alarm when any of the traps have been triggered, or if the system has lost contact with any trap-transmitter. The automated system allowed us to constantly monitor transmitters from a research camp, and alerted us each time a trap was triggered. The system has been field-tested for 83 days from mid-September 2010 to mid-december 2010 in the Tost mountain range on the edge of Mongolia's Gobi desert. During this time, the system performed reliably, responding correctly to 45 manually generated alarms and 9 animal captures. The system considerably shortens the time the captured animals spend in traps, and also mitigates the need for manual trap-site transmitter monitoring, greatly reducing risk to the animal and the human effort involved.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1379  
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Author Oli, M.K. url  openurl
  Title Ecology and conservation of snow leopard project Type Report
  Year 1991 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 6628 Issue Pages 1-9  
  Keywords 1990; conservation; ecology; Report; snow leopard; Wwf  
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  Notes WWF Project #6628: progress report 2 for the period December 1990 – March 1991. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 984 Serial 743  
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Author Li, J. Schaller, G, B. McCarthy, T. M. Wang, D. Jiagong, Z. Cai, P. Basang, L. Lu, Z url  openurl
  Title A Communal Sign Post of Snow Leopards (Panthera uncial) and Other Species on the Tibetan Plateau China Type Journal Article
  Year 2012 Publication International Journal of Biodiversity Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 2013 Issue Pages 1:8  
  Keywords snow leopard, Tibetan Plateau, sign post, conservation  
  Abstract The snow leopard is a keystone species in mountain ecosystems of Central Asia and the Tibetan Plateau, However, little is known about the interactions between snow leopards and sympatric carnivores. Using infrared cameras, we found a rocky junction of two valleys in Sanjiangyuan area on the Tibetan Plateau where many mammals in this area passed and frequently marked and sniffed the site at the junction. We suggest that this site serves as a sign post to many species in this area, especially snow leopards and other carnivores. The marked signs may also alert the animals passing by to temporally segregate their activities to avoid potential conflicts. We used the Schoener index to measure the degree of temporal segregation among the species captured by infrared camera traps at this site. Our research reveals the probable ways of both intra- and interspecies competition. This is an important message to help understand the structure of animal communities. Discovery of the sign post clarifies the importance of identifying key habitas ad sites of both snow leopards and other species for more effective conservation.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1389  
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Author Allen, P. url  openurl
  Title Conservation Increases Crafts Income Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) Winter, 2002 Issue Pages 7  
  Keywords crafts; conservation; herders; Sle; snow-leopard-enterprises; nomadic; Mongolia; wool; income; tourists; poaching; incentive; livestock; zoos; browse; 4310  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Full Text at URLJournal Title: Crafts News Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 419 Serial 67  
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Author Bhatnagar, Y.V. url  openurl
  Title Project Snow Leopard Type Conference Article
  Year 2010 Publication Nature Without Borders Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 613 Issue Pages 44-48  
  Keywords  
  Abstract Nature Without Borders: a symposium on innovative approaches to conserving nature and wildlife. http://www.india-seminar.com/2010/613.htm

IN January 2009, the Ministry of Environment and Forests launched an ambitious conservation programme called Project Snow Leopard for the Indian high altitude areas. This was a unique endeavour that was catalyzed by a voluntary organization, with active participation of the five Himalayan state governments, the ministry and a select group of organizations and individuals in a consultative process which lasted close to four years. Given, however, a good representation of wildlife protected areas in the high altitudes (over 9% for the Trans Himalaya), the question is why was such a scheme required; what were the attributes of the region that necessitated an alternative strategy? This article discusses the salient features of the snow leopard initiative and the challenges ahead.
 
  Address http://www.india-seminar.com/2010/613/613yashveer_bhatnagar.htm  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication India Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference Nature Without Borders  
  Notes Author from: Nature Conservation Foundation, Mysore and Snow Leopard Trust-India Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1137  
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Author Linnell, J.; Swenson, J.; Landa A.; and Kvam, T. url  openurl
  Title Methods for monitoring European large carnivores – A worldwide review of relevant experience Type Journal Article
  Year 1998 Publication NINA Oppdragsmelding Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 549 Issue Pages 1-38  
  Keywords carnivore; monitoring; census; bear; Lynx; wolf; wolverine; 5310  
  Abstract Against a background of recovering large carnivore populations in Norway, and many other areas of Europe, it is becoming increasingly important to develop methods to monitor their populations. A variety of parameters can monitored depending on objectives. These parameters include: presence/absense, distribution, population trend indices, minimum counts, statistical estimates of population size, reproductive parameters and health/condition. Three broad categories of monitoring techniques can be recognised each with increasing levels of fieldwork required. The first category includes those techniques that do not require original fieldwork. The second category involves fieldwork, but where individually recognisable carnivores are not available. The third category includes methods where fieldwork has recognisable individuals available. Different mehtods tend to have been used for different species, mainly because of limitations imposed by the different species' ecology. The most precise estimates of population size have been obtained in research projects with relatively small study sites and with the help of radio-telemetry. However, it may be difficult, or impossible, to apply these methods over large monitoring areas. Therefore, in terms of practical management, a combination of minimum counts, supported by an independent index may be more useful than statistical population estimates. All methods should be subject to a careful design process, and power analysis should be conducted to determine the sensitivity of the method to detect changes.

Based on the review of over 200 papers and reports we recommend a package of complementary monitoring methods for brown bear, wolverine, lynx and wolf in Norway. These include the use of observations from the public and reports of predation on livestock to determine broad patterns of distribution, and an index based on hunter observations per hunting day, for all four species. Minimum counts of reproductive units, natal dens, family groups, and packs, should be obtained from snow-tracking for wolverines, lynx and wolves respectively. In addition a track-count index should be obtained for wolverines and lynx. As much data as possible should be obtained of lynx and wolvereines killed in the annual harvest. Brown bears will be difficult to monitor without the use of radio-telemetry, therfore they may require periodic telemetry based, mark-recapture studies. Such a program can easily be constructed within existing central and regional wildlife management structures, but will require extensive involvement from hunters.
 
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  Notes Document Type: English Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 516 Serial 622  
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Author Chapron, G. url  openurl
  Title Re-wilding: other projects help carnivores stay wild Type Journal Article
  Year 2005 Publication Nature Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 437 Issue Pages 318  
  Keywords Acinonyx jubatus, carnivore, coexistence, conservation, damage prevention, Panthera leo, snow leopard, survival, Uncia uncia  
  Abstract Letter to Nature Editor, in response to: In their plea for bringing Pleistocene wildlife to the New World (“Re-wilding North America” Nature 436, 913–914; 2005), Josh Donlan and colleagues do not discuss successful efforts to ensure long-term survival of large carnivores in Africa and Asia. A few examples are given.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1114  
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Author Subbotin, A.E.; Istomov, S.V. url  openurl
  Title The population status of snow leopards Uncia uncia (Felidae, Carnivora) in the western Sayan Mountain Ridge Type Journal Article
  Year 2009 Publication Doklady Biologicl Sciences Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 425 Issue Pages 183-186  
  Keywords population; status; snow; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; leopard; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; Felidae; Carnivora; Sayan; mountain; Russian; Test; species; cat; Russia; area; range; Data; study; activity; activities; behavior; habitats; habitat; humans; Human; number; description; Animal; structure  
  Abstract The snow leopard (Uncia uncial Schreber, 1776) is the most poorly studied species of the cat family in the world and, in particular, in Russia, where the northern periphery of the species area (no more than 3% of it) is located in the Altai-Hangai-Sayan range [1]. It is generally known that the existing data on the Russian part of the snow leopard population have never been a result of targeted studies; at best, they have been based on recording the traces of the snow leopard vital activity [2]. This is explained by the snow leopard's elusive behavior, inaccessibility of its habitats for humans, and its naturally small total numbers in the entire species area. All published data on the population status of the snow leopard in Russia, from the first descriptions of the species [3-6] to the latest studies [7, 8] are subjective, often speculative, and are not confirmed by

quantitative estimates. It is obvious, however, that every accurate observation of this animal is of particular interest [9]. The purpose of our study was to determine the structure and size of the population group presumably inhabiting the Western Sayan mountain ridge at the northern boundary of the species area
 
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  Publisher Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. Place of Publication Editor  
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  ISSN 0012-4966 ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Original Russian test published in Doklady Akademii Nauk, Vol. 425, No.6, pp.846-849. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1005 Serial 941  
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Author Johnson, W.E.; Eizirik, E.; Pecon-Slattery, J.; Murphy, W.J.; Antunes, A.; Teeling, E.; O'Brien, S.J. url  openurl
  Title The Late Miocene Radiation of Modern Felidae: A Genetic Assessment Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2006 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 311 Issue Pages 74-77  
  Keywords carnivore; classification; divergence; Dna; Felidae; fossil; lineages; Miocene; mitochondrial; Molecular; phylogeny; radiation; taxonomic  
  Abstract Modern felid species descend from relatively recent (G11 million years ago) divergence and speciation events that produced successful predatory carnivores worldwide but that have confounded taxonomic classifications. A highly resolved molecular phylogeny with divergence dates for all living cat species, derived from autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial gene segments (22,789 base pairs) and 16 fossil calibrations define eight principal lineages produced through at least 10 intercontinental migrations facilitated by sea-level fluctuations. A ghost lineage analysis indicates that available felid fossils underestimate (i.e., unrepresented basal branch length) first occurrence by an average of 76%, revealing a low representation of felid lineages in paleontological remains. The phylogenetic performance of distinct gene classes showed that Y-chromosome segments are appreciably more informative than mitochondrial DNA, X-linked, or autosomal genes in resolving the rapid Felidae species radiation.  
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 908 Serial 502  
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Author Warren E.Johnson, E.E. url  openurl
  Title The Late Miocene Radiation of Modern Felidae: A Genetic Assessment Type Miscellaneous
  Year 2006 Publication Science Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume (down) 311 Issue Pages 73-77  
  Keywords classification; divergence; Dna; Felidae; genetics; Miocene; mitochondrial; phylogeny; radiation; species; taxonomic  
  Abstract Modern felid species descend from relatively recent (<11 million years ago) divergence and

speciation events that produced successful predatory carnivores worldwide but that have

confounded taxonomic classifications. A highly resolved molecular phylogeny with divergence dates

for all living cat species, derived from autosomal, X-linked, Y-linked, and mitochondrial gene

segments (22,789 base pairs) and 16 fossil calibrations define eight principal lineages produced

through at least 10 intercontinental migrations facilitated by sea-level fluctuations. A ghost lineage

analysis indicates that available felid fossils underestimate (i.e., unrepresented basal branch

length) first occurrence by an average of 76%, revealing a low representation of felid lineages

in paleontological remains. The phylogenetic performance of distinct gene classes showed that

Y-chromosome segments are appreciably more informative than mitochondrial DNA, X-linked,

or autosomal genes in resolving the rapid Felidae species radiation.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Washington D.C. Editor Jill Pecon-Slattery, W.J.M., Agostinho Antunes, Emma Teeling, Stephen J.O'Brien  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 880 Serial 1008  
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