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Author Mazoomdaar, J.
Title (up) Cat Among the People Type Magazine Article
Year 2011 Publication Open Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 8 August Pages 40-45
Keywords snow leopard, India, Bhatnagar, Chundawat, Nature Conservation Foundation, Hemis, Kibber, Himmel
Abstract
Address www.openthemagazine.com
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Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes http://openthemagazine.com/article/nation/cat-among-the-people Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1358
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Author Suryawanshi, K. R., Redpath, S. M., Bhatnagar, Y. V., Ramakrishnan, U., Chaturvedi, V., Smout, S. C., Mishra, C.
Title (up) Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards Type Journal Article
Year Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-11
Keywords apparent competition, apparent facilitation, conservation conflicts, indirect interactions, predator� prey interactions, snow leopard
Abstract An increasing proportion of the world�s poor is rearing livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing. Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory

killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern. A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wild prey populations based on the assumption that the carnivores will consume this alternative food. Livestock predation, however, could either reduce or intensify with increases in wild prey depending on prey choice and trends in carnivore abundance. We show that the extent of livestock predation by the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia

intensifies with increases in the density of wild ungulate prey, and subsequently stabilizes. We found that snow leopard density, estimated at seven sites, was a positive linear function of the density of wild ungulates�the preferred prey�and showed no discernible relationship with livestock density. We also found that modelled livestock predation increased with livestock density. Our results suggest that snow leopard conservation would benefit from an increase in wild ungulates, but that would intensify the problem of livestock predation for pastoralists. The potential benefits of increased wild prey abundance in reducing livestock predation

can be overwhelmed by a resultant increase in snow leopard populations. Snow leopard conservation efforts aimed atfacilitating increases in wild prey must be accompanied by greater assistance for better livestock

protection and offsetting the economic damage caused by carnivores.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1452
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Author Suryawanshi, K. R., Redpath, S., Bhatnagar, Y. V., Ramakrishnan, U., Chaturvedi, V., Smout, S. C., Mishra, C.
Title (up) Impact of wild prey availability on livestock predation by snow leopards Type Journal Article
Year 2017 Publication Royal Society Open Science Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-11
Keywords apparent competition, apparent facilitation, conservation conflicts, indirect interactions, predator� prey interactions, snow leopard
Abstract An increasing proportion of the world�s poor is rearing

livestock today, and the global livestock population is growing.

Livestock predation by large carnivores and their retaliatory

killing is becoming an economic and conservation concern.

A common recommendation for carnivore conservation and

for reducing predation on livestock is to increase wild prey

populations based on the assumption that the carnivores

will consume this alternative food. Livestock predation,

however, could either reduce or intensify with increases

in wild prey depending on prey choice and trends in

carnivore abundance. We show that the extent of livestock

predation by the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia

intensifies with increases in the density of wild ungulate

prey, and subsequently stabilizes. We found that snow leopard

density, estimated at seven sites, was a positive linear

function of the density of wild ungulates�the preferred

prey�and showed no discernible relationship with livestock

density. We also found that modelled livestock predation

increased with livestock density. Our results suggest that

snow leopard conservation would benefit from an increase

in wild ungulates, but that would intensify the problem of

livestock predation for pastoralists. The potential benefits of

increased wild prey abundance in reducing livestock predation

can be overwhelmed by a resultant increase in snow leopard

populations. Snow leopard conservation efforts aimed at

facilitating increases in wild prey must be accompanied by greater assistance for better livestock

protection and offsetting the economic damage caused by carnivores.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1457
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author Jamtsho, Y., Katel, O.
Title (up) Livestock depredation by snow leopard and Tibetan wolf: Implications for herders� livelihoods in Wangchuck Centennial National Park, Bhutan Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Springer Open Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 9:1 Pages 1-10
Keywords Wildlife-livestock conflicts, Endangered predators, Protected area, Income loss
Abstract Human-wildlife conflict (HWC) is a serious problem in many parts of the world, and Bhutan�s Wangchuck Centennial

National Park (WCNP) is no exception. Located in the remote alpine areas of the eastern Himalaya, wildlife species

such as snow leopard (SL) and Tibetan wolf (TW) are reported to kill livestock in many parts of the Park. Such

depredation is believed to have affected the livelihoods of high-altitude herding communities, resulting in conflicts

between them. This study provides analysis on the extent of livestock depredation by wildlife predators such as SL

and TW and examines its implications for the livelihoods of herding communities of Choekhortoe and Dhur regions

of WCNP. Using semi-structured questionnaires, all herders (n = 38) in the study area were interviewed. The questions

pertained to livestock population, frequency of depredation and income lost due to depredation in the last five years

from 2012 to 2016. This study recorded 2,815 livestock heads in the study area, with an average herd size of 74.1 stock.

The average herd size holding showed a decreasing trend over the years, and one of the reasons cited by the herders

is depredation by SL and TW and other predators. This loss equated to an average annual financial loss equivalent to

10.2% (US$837) of their total per capita cash income. Such losses have resulted in negative impacts on herders�

livelihood; e.g. six herders (2012-2016) even stopped rearing livestock and resorted to an alternate source of cash

income. The livestock intensification programmes, including pasture improvement through allowing controlled

burning, and financial compensation, may be some potential short-term solutions to reduce conflict between herders

and predators. Issuing permits for cordyceps (Ophiocordyceps sinensis) collection only to the herders and instilling the

sense of stewardship to highland herders may be one of the long-term solutions.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1479
Permanent link to this record