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Author (up)
Title Rare Animals and their Protection in the USSR Type Miscellaneous
Year 1978 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 4-4
Keywords Uzbekistan; categories of threat; rare species; snow leopard; distribution; threats.; 8030; Russian
Abstract It described categories of threat (Category A and Category B). Snow leopard was assessed under Category A the species whose numbers and habitats have sharply diminished and are continuing to diminish as a consequence of direct persecution, destruction of their habitat or other causes. The snow leopard (Pardus uncia) inhabits the mountains of the Tien Shan range, Tarbagatai, Saur, Altai and the Sayans. Exploitation of mountain areas and depletion of stocks of wild ungulates (Siberian mountain goats and wild sheep) have led to a sharp reduction in the number of snow leopards. It is estimated that today only about one thousand leopards are left, and they have accordingly been placed under complete protection. Hunting and selective shooting are everywhere prohibited. Catching leopards is regulated by the articles of the international convention restricting trade in rare species of plants and animals.
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Language Russian Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Uzbekistan's Reservations and Natural Monuments. XIV General Assembly of the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 781 Serial 14
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Author (up) Akimushkin I.
Title Snow leopard or irbis Type Miscellaneous
Year 1988 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 139-140
Keywords Ussr; snow leopard; number; food; behavior; reproduction; threats.; 6000; Russian
Abstract Snow leopard behavioral patterns, food preferences, and reproduction are described in a popular way. The population of snow leopard is defined to be 1,000 animals. A reason for the population decline is hunting for the sake of beautiful fur.
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Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Animal kingdom. Mammals or animals. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 579 Serial 49
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Author (up) Allen, P.; Macray, D.
Title Snow Leopard Enterprises Description and Summarized Business Plan Type Conference Article
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords snow; leopard; enterprises; buisness; plan; habitat; humans; conflict; irbis; products; wool; conservation; marketing; Mongolia; social; economic; conflicts; country; countries; socks; hats; gloves; 4890; Human; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; central; Central Asia; asia; ecosystem; region; populations; population; herders; herder; threat; potential; impact; environment; Elements; landscape; International; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust; snow-leopard-enterprises
Abstract The habitat for both humans and snow leopards in Central Asia is marginal, the ecosystem fragile. The struggle for humans to survive has often, unfortunately, brought them into conflict with the region's dwindling snow leopard populations. Herders commonly see leopards as a threat to their way of life and well-being. Efforts to improve the living conditions of humans must consider potential impacts on the environment. Likewise, conservation initiatives cannot ignore humans as elements of the landscape with a right to live with dignity and pride. Based on these principles, the International Snow Leopard Trust has developed a new conservation model that addresses the needs of all concerned.

We call it Snow Leopard Enterprises..
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Publisher Islt Place of Publication Seattle Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Title, Monographic: Proceedings of the Snow Leopard Survival SummitPlace of Meeting: Seattle,WA Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 475 Serial 68
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Author (up) Augugliaro, C., Paniccia, C., Janchivlamdan, C., Monti, I. E., Boldbaatar, T., Munkhtsog, B.
Title Mammal inventory in the Mongolian Gobi, with the southeasternmost documented record of the Snow Leopard, Panthera uncia (Schreber, 1775), in the country Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Check List Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue 4 Pages 575-578
Keywords Camera trapping, desert, live trapping, mammal checklist, species richness, threatened species.
Abstract Studies on mammal diversity and distribution are an important source to develop conservation and management strategies.

The area located in southern Mongolia, encompassing the Alashan Plateau Semi-Desert and the Eastern Gobi Desert-Steppe ecoregions, is considered strategic for the conservation of threatened species. We surveyed the non-volant mammals in the Small Gobi-A Strictly Protected Area (SPA) and its surroundings, by using camera trapping, live trapping, and occasional sightings. We recorded 18 mammal species belonging to 9 families and 6 orders. Among them, 4 are globally threatened or near-threatened, 2 are included in the CITES Appendix I, and 2 are listed in the Appendix II. Moreover, we provide the southeasternmost record for the Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) in Mongolia, supported by photographic evidence. Our study highlights the importance of this protected area to preserve rare, threatened, and elusive species.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1486
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Author (up) Bannikov A.G.
Title Snow leopard (irbis). Felis uncia Type Miscellaneous
Year 1973 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 44
Keywords Ussr; snow leopard; distribution; life history; threats.; 6150; Russian
Abstract Irbis is distributed in highlands of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Altai. It preys mainly on wild sheep and ibex, marmots, pica, snow-cock, rarer other ungulates, rodents and birds. Sometimes it attacks domestic sheep. At the beginning of spring this species is on heat, gestation period being 90 100 days. Female bears two three (to five) cubs. The litter splits in one year. The animal sheds hair twice a year. It has a low population and therefore hunting for snow leopard is prohibited.
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Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Game animals and birds of the USSR. Reference book and identifier. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 593 Serial 114
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Author (up) Bekenov A.B.
Title About the IUCN categories and criteria for animals inclusion in Red Data Books and lists (project INTAS 99-1483) Type Miscellaneous
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 67-71
Keywords Kazakhstan; Red Data book; categories of threat; assessment; snow leopard.; 6220; Russian
Abstract Uncia uncia in Kazakhstan is defined as EN C 2a(i); D1. The International Red List (2000) attributes this species to EN C 2a, which is an example of concurrence in the assessments at regional and global levels.
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Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Zoological studies in Kazakhstan. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 600 Serial 127
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Author (up) Blomqvist, L.; Dexel, B.
Title In Focus: Declining numbers of wild snow leopards Type Miscellaneous
Year 2006 Publication EAZA Zoo News Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 26-27
Keywords asia; Cites; conflict; habitat loss; herder; laws; poaching; protection; snow leopard; threat; trade; Uncia uncia
Abstract International collaboration to ensure the long-term survival of snow leopards (Uncia uncia) in the wild is today more acutely needed than ever! Trade in live snow leopards, their skins and bones, has during the last decade reached such extensiveness that the species is in danger of being wiped out from many of its former habitats. All recent surveys support declining populations throughout most of their range.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 887 Serial 172
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Author (up) Chalise, M.K.
Title Snow Leopard (Uncia uncia), Prey Species and Outreach in Langtang National, Park, Nepal Type Journal Article
Year 2011 Publication Our Nature Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 9 Pages 138-145
Keywords Snow leopard, Langtang, prey species, threats, outreach.
Abstract Presence of snow leopard (Uncia uncia) in Langtang National Park was obscure till 2003. It was confirmed by a

research team trained for the wildlife biology in the field. Along with the study of ecology and behavior of snow leopard sufficient effort were made to generate data on pre species. The study also dealt with threat perceived for the leopard survival while basic unit of conservation- local outreach programs were also initiated.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1388
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Author (up) Clyde, V.L.; Ramsay, E.C.; Bemis, D.A.
Title Fecal shedding of Salmonella in exotic felids Type Journal Article
Year 1997 Publication J.Zoo Wildl.Med Abbreviated Journal
Volume 28 Issue 2 Pages 148-152
Keywords antibiotics; captive-animal-care; diarrhea; endangered; threatened-species; handling-methods; mammals parasites; Diseases; salmonella; zoos; snow-leopard; leopard; salmonellosis; husbandry; captive; Animal; care; threatened; species; handling; mammals; parasites; snow; browse; 1320
Abstract The authors discuss the occurrence of salmonellosis in collections of exotic felids. Data suggest that zoo employees having contact with cat feces or raw diets have a high rate of occupational exposure to Salmonella and should exercise appropriate hygienic precautions. pcp
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Notes Milwaukee Cty. Zoo, Milwaukee, WI 53226 Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 304 Serial 227
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Author (up) Dementiev G.P.
Title Mammals Type Miscellaneous
Year 1969 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 19-27
Keywords Ussr; endangered species; snow leopard; distribution; fluctuation; threats.; 6490; Russian
Abstract It provides a list and discusses a status of rare and endangered predators and ungulates in the USSR (24 species in total). Snow leopard inhabits the mountain ridges of Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan, in the Altai and Tuva. The habitat of snow leopard had not changed significantly since recently, though its population had been reducing (according to materials of the year 1967). Such reduction of its population is because of the common assumption of its harmfulness and high demand for its fur-skin and high prices that zoos would readily pay for the animals.
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Notes Full text available in RussianJournal Title: Rare and endangered mammal and bird species in the USSR. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 627 Serial 234
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