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Author Taber, R.D.
Title Toward a Free-Living Snow Leopard Recovery Plan Type Conference Article
Year 1988 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 261
Keywords snow-leopard-recovery-plan; recovery; conservation; Islt; Species-survial-plan; management; browse; 4240
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Publisher ISLT and Wildlife Institute of India Place of Publication Usa Editor H.Freeman
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Full Text Available at URLAuthor Affiliation: ISLTTitle, Monographic: Proceedings of the Fifth International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: Srinagar, IndiaDate of Copyright: 1988 Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 412 Serial 956
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Author Han, X. Miquelle, D. G., Zhang, E., Jones, M., and Jin, T..
Title Far eastern leopard and Siberian tiger conservation measures. Type Conference Article
Year 2001 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 102-103
Keywords CCT, conservation, conservation needs, conservation strategy, distribution, Jilin Province, leopard, monitoring, Panthera pardus, Panthera tigris, poaching, recovery, Recovery plan, snow
Abstract Workshop to develop a recovery plan for the wild north China tiger population. October 20th to 23th, 2000, Harbin.

Like the Siberian Tiger, the Far Eastern Leopard is one of China's largest Felidae and lives mainly in the eastern mountains of Jilin Province. The number of leopards is very low and it is even more endangered than the tiger. There is a very close relationship between leopard and tiger conservation, especially in areas where overlap occurs. In these areas, special emphasis has to be placed on each of the species' specific conservation needs. There is urgent need to step up our efforts to study and monitor leopard populations and to develop a conservation strategy. This document contains information of the status and main threats of the Far Eastern leopard and makes recommendations on needed conservation measures.
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Corporate Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund Thesis
Publisher Widlife Conservation Society Place of Publication Harbin Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1117
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Author Ale, S.B.; Yonzon, P.; Thapa, K.
Title Recovery of snow leopard Uncia uncia in Sagarmatha (Mount Everest) National Park, Nepal Type Miscellaneous
Year 2007 Publication Oryx Abbreviated Journal
Volume 41 Issue Pages (down) 89-92
Keywords Nepal; recovery; Sagarmatha Mount Everest National Park; snow leopard; Uncia uncia; surveys; survey; snow; snow-leopard; leopard; uncia; Uncia-uncia; valley; Sagarmatha; national; national park; National-park; park; using; information; management; system; research; transects; transect; sign; areas; area; snow leopards; snow-leopards; leopards; 40; Himalayan; tahr; musk; musk-deer; deer; location; recent; species; grazing; land; Forest; habitat; domestic; wild; ungulates; ungulate; livestock; tourism; development; traditional; land use; land-use; use; wildlife
Abstract From September to November 2004 we conducted surveys of snow leopard Uncia uncia signs in three major valleys in Sagarmatha (Mount Everest) National Park in Nepal using the Snow Leopard Information Management System, a standardized survey technique for snow leopard research. We walked 24 transects covering c. 14 km and located 33 sites with 56 snow leopard signs, and 17 signs incidentally in other areas. Snow leopards appear to have re-inhabited the Park, following their disappearance c. 40 years ago, apparently following the recovery of Himalayan tahr Hemitragus jemlahicus and musk deer Moschus chrysogaster populations. Taken together the locations of all 73 recent snow leopard signs indicate that the species is using predominantly grazing land and shrubland/ open forest at elevations of 3,000-5,000 m, habitat types that are also used by domestic and wild ungulates. Sagarmatha is the homeland of c. 3,500 Buddhist Sherpas with .3,000 livestock. Along with tourism and associated developments in Sagarmatha, traditional land use practices could be used to ensure coexistence of livestock and wildlife, including the recovering snow leopards, and ensure the wellbeing of the Sherpas.
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Notes http://www.snowleopardnetwork.org/bibliography/Ale_2007.pdf Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 884 Serial 58
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Author Ale S.
Title Have snow leopards made a comeback to the Everest region of Nepal? Type Report
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 1-21
Keywords snow; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; leopard; region; Nepal; Report; International; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust; program; 1960; endangered; Sagarmatha; High; Himalaya; tourism; impact; establishment; national; national park; National-park; park; 1980; area; Tibet; surveys; survey; status; Cats; cat; prey; research; project; sign; transects; transect; length; valley; Response; hunting; recovery; Himalayan; tahr; density; densities; range; pugmarks; sighting; 60; study; population; predators; predator; structure; prey species; prey-species; species; populations; mortality; effects; predation; population dynamics
Abstract In the 1960s, the endangered snow leopard was locally extirpated from the Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) region of Nepal. In this Sherpa-inhabited high Himalaya, the flourishing tourism since the ascent of Mt Everest in 1953, has caused both prosperity and adverse impacts, the concern that catalyzed the establishment of Mt. Everest National Park in the region in 1976. In the late 1980s, there were reports that some transient snow leopards may have visited the area from adjoining Tibet, but no biological surveys exist to confirm the status of the cats and their prey. Have snow leopards finally returned to the top of the world? Exploring this question was the main purpose of this research project. We systematically walked altogether 24 sign transects covering over 13 km in length in three valleys, i.e. Namche, Phortse and Gokyo, of the park, and counted several snow leopard signs. The results indicated that snow leopards have made a comeback in the park in response to decades of protective measures, the virtual cessation of hunting and the recovery of the Himalayan tahr which is snow leopard's prey. The average sign density (4.2 signs/km and 2.5 sign sites/km) was comparable to that reported from other parts of the cats' range in the Himalaya. On this basis, we estimated the cat density in the Everest region between 1 to 3 cats per 100 sq km, a figure that was supported by different sets of pugmarks and actual sightings of snow leopards in the 60 km2 sample survey area. In the study area, tahr population had a low reproductive rate (e.g. kids-to-females ratio, 0.1, in Namche). Since predators can influence the size and the structure of prey species populations through mortality and through non-lethal effects or predation risk, snow leopards could have been the cause of the population dynamics of tahr in Sagarmtha, but this study could not confirm this speculation for which further probing may be required.
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Notes Progress report for the International Snow Leopard Trust Small Grants Program. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1063 Serial 50
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Author Bacha, M.S.
Title Snow leopard recovery program for Kishtwar High Altitude National Park Jammu and Kashmir State 1986-7 to 1989-90 Type Report
Year 1990 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 1-58
Keywords Jammu; Kashmir; national park; protection; recovery; snow leopard; wildlife
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Publisher Place of Publication Srinagar, Kashmir Editor
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Notes Department of Wildlife Protection, Jammu and Kashmir State, Srinagar. Report prepared by Research Officer Mr. M. Shafi Bacha. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 946 Serial 105
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Author Suryawanshi, K.R.
Title Towards snow leopard prey recovery: understanding the resource use strategies and demographic responses of bharal Pseudois nayaur to livestock grazing and removal; Final project report Type Report
Year 2009 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 1-43
Keywords project; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; network; conservation; program; prey; recovery; resource; use; strategy; demographic; Response; bharal; Pseudois; pseudois nayaur; Pseudois-nayaur; nayaur; livestock; grazing; Report; decline; wild; populations; population; Himalayan; region; Competition; threats; threat; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; study; diet; winter; Test; browse; nutrition; areas; area; young; Female; times; High; Adult; mortality; species; predators; predator; endangered; trans-himalaya; transhimalaya
Abstract Decline of wild prey populations in the Himalayan region, largely due to competition with livestock, has been identified as one of the main threats to the snow leopard Uncia uncia. Studies show that bharal Pseudois nayaur diet is dominated by graminoids during summer, but the proportion of graminoids declines in winter. We explore the causes for the decline of graminoids from bharal winter diet and resulting implications for bharal conservation. We test the predictions generated by two alternative hypotheses, (H1) low graminoid availability caused by livestock grazing during winter causes bharal to include browse in their diet, and, (H2) bharal include browse, with relatively higher nutrition, to compensate for the poor quality of graminoids during winter. Graminoid availability was highest in areas without livestock grazing, followed by areas with moderate and intense livestock grazing. Graminoid quality in winter was relatively lower than that of browse, but the difference was not statistically significant. Bharal diet was dominated by graminoids in areas with highest graminoid availability. Graminoid contribution to bharal diet declined monotonically with a decline in graminoid availability. Bharal young to female ratio was three times higher in areas with high graminoid availability than areas with low graminoid availability. No starvation-related adult mortalities were observed in any of the areas. Composition of bharal winter diet was governed predominantly by the availability of graminoids in the rangelands. Since livestock grazing reduces graminoid availability, creation of livestock free areas is necessary for conservation of grazing species such as the bharal and its predators such as the endangered snow leopard in the Trans-Himalaya.
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Notes Project funded by Snow Leopard Network's Snow Leopard Conservation Grant Program, 2008. Nature Conservation Foundation, Mysore. Post-graduate Program in Wildlife Biology and Conservation, National Centre for Biological Sciences, Wildlife Conservation Society -India program, Bangalore, India. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1077 Serial 952
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Author Anonymous
Title Toward a free-ranging recovery plan Type Manuscript
Year 1986 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages (down) 1-14
Keywords International Snow Leopard Symposium, recovery plan, snow leopard
Abstract This draft is a first attempt to develop a Snow Leopard Recovery Plan, for consideration at the Fifth International Snow Leopard Symposium. It is intended as a working base for agencies responsible for snow leopard conservation, research and management. The plan, when thoroughly reviewed and revised, will provide more accurate estimates of snow leopard status and threats, and recommendations concerning actions necessary for the maintenance, enhancement and recovery of the snow leopard in its original habitat.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1133
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