|   | 
Details
   web
Records
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard poaching and trade in China 2000-2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone, Pelt,Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1411
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard poaching and trade in China 2000- 2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone Pelt, Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.


Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1412
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Lu, Z.
Title Snow Leopard Poaching and Trade in China 2000-2013 Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 176 Pages 207-211
Keywords Bone, Pelt, Panthera uncial, Retaliatory killing, Sanjiangyuan
Abstract The snow leopard is a flagship species of the alpine ecosystem in the Central Asia, with China comprising

nearly 60% of the habitat and population. It was listed as endangered by IUCN and included in Appendix I

of CITES in the 1970s. Poaching for its fur and bones is a significant and increasing threat to snow leopards

globally. However, little detailed information is available on snow leopard poaching in China. Here,

we collected all reported cases of snow leopard poaching and trade in China 2000–2013. We found that

snow leopard parts were mainly traded in the major cities within their range provinces, but also began to

emerge in a few coastal cities after 2010. Household interviews in the Sanjiangyuan Region in Qinghai

Province showed that in this sub region alone, 11 snow leopards were killed annually, accounting for

about 1.2% of the estimated snow leopard population there.


Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1414
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Weckworth, B. V., McCarthy, T. M., Liang, X., Liu, Y., Xing, R., Li, D., Zhang, Y., Xue, Y., Jackson, R., Xiao, L., Cheng, C., Li, S., Xu, F., Ma, M., Yang, X., Diao, K., Gao, Y., Song, D., Nowell, K., He, B., Li, Y., McCarthy, K., Paltsyn, M. Y., Sharma, K., Mishra, C., Schaller, G. B., Lu, Z., Beissinger, S. R.
Title Defining priorities for global snow leopard conservation landscapes Type Journal Article
Year 2019 Publication Biological Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 241 Issue 108387 Pages 1-10
Keywords Panthera uncia, Conservation prioritization, Landscape Conservation Unit, Connectivity, Linkage
Abstract The snow leopard (Panthera uncia) is an apex predator on the Tibetan Plateau and in the surrounding mountain ranges. It is listed as Vulnerable in the IUCN's Red List. The large home range and low population densities of this species mandate range-wide conservation prioritization. Two efforts for range-wide snow leopard conservation planning have been conducted based on expert opinion, but both were constrained by limited knowledge and the difficulty of evaluating complex processes, such as connectivity across large landscapes. Here, we compile > 6000 snow leopard occurrence records from across its range and corresponding environmental covariates to build a model of global snow leopard habitat suitability. Using spatial prioritization tools, we identi!ed seven large continuous habitat patches as global snow leopard Landscape Conservation Units (LCUs). Each LCU faces differing threat levels from poaching, anthropogenic development, and climate change. We identi!ed ten po- tential inter-LCU linkages, and centrality analysis indicated that Tianshan-Pamir-Hindu Kush-Karakorum, Altai, and the linkage between them play a critical role in maintaining the global snow leopard habitat connectivity.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1490
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Li, J., Yin, H., Wang, D., Jiagong, Z., Lu, Zhi
Title Human-snow leopard conflicts in the Sanjiangyuan Region of the Tibetan Plateau Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Biological Conservs Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 166 Pages 118-123
Keywords Panthera uncia, Human-wildlife conflict, Traditional use, Livestock depredation, Economic value, Cultural image, Attitude
Abstract Conflicts between humans and snow leopards are documented across much of their overlapping distribution

in Central Asia. These conflicts manifest themselves primarily in the form of livestock depredation

and the killing of snow leopards by local herders. This source of mortality to snow leopards is a key conservation concern. To investigate human-snow leopard conflicts in the Sanjiangyuan Region of the Tibetan Plateau, we conducted household interviews about local herders’ traditional use of snow leopard

parts, livestock depredation, and overall attitudes towards snow leopards. We found most respondents

(58%) knew that snow leopard parts had been used for traditional customs in the past, but they claimed

not in the past two or three decades. It may be partly due to the issuing of the Protection of Wildlife Law

in 1998 by the People’s Republic of China. Total livestock losses were damaging (US$ 6193 per household

in the past 1 year), however snow leopards were blamed by herders for only a small proportion of those

losses (10%), as compared to wolves (45%) and disease (42%). Correspondingly, the cultural images of

snow leopards were neutral (78%) and positive (9%) on the whole. It seems that human-snow leopard

conflict is not intense in this area. However, snow leopards could be implicated by the retaliatory killing

of wolves. We recommend a multi-pronged conservation program that includes compensation, insurance

programs, and training local veterinarians to reduce livestock losses.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1399
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) LI. J, WANG. D, YIN. H,ZHAXI. D, JIAGONG. Z,SCHALLER. G. B,MISHRA. C,MCCARTHY. T. M, WANG. H,WU. L,XIAO. L,BASANG. L,ZHANG. Y,ZHOU. Y,LU. Z
Title Role of Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries in Snow Leopard Conservation Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 00 Issue Pages 1-8
Keywords conservation strategy, distribution, MaxEnt, nature reserve, Panthera uncia, sacred mountain
Abstract The snow leopard (Panthera uncia) inhabits the rugged mountains in 12 countries of Central Asia,

including the Tibetan Plateau. Due to poaching, decreased abundance of prey, and habitat degradation, it was listed as endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 1972. Current conservation strategies, including nature reserves and incentive programs, have limited capacities to protect snow leopards. We investigated the role of Tibetan Buddhist monasteries in snow leopard conservation in the Sanjiangyuan region in China’s Qinghai Province on the Tibetan Plateau. From 2009 to 2011, we systematically surveyed snow leopards in the Sanjiangyuan region. We used the MaxEnt model to determine the relation of their presence to environmental variables (e.g., elevation, ruggedness) and to predict snow leopard distribution. Model results showed 89,602 km2 of snow leopard habitat in the Sanjiangyuan region, of which 7674 km2 lay within Sanjiangyuan Nature Reserve’s core zones. We analyzed the spatial relation between snow leopard habitat and Buddhist monasteries and found that 46% of monasteries were located in snow leopard habitat and 90% were within 5 km of snow leopard habitat. The 336 monasteries in the Sanjiangyuan region could protect more snow leopard habitat (8342 km2) through social norms and active patrols than the nature reserve’s core zones. We conducted 144 household interviews to identify local herders’ attitudes and behavior toward snow leopards and other wildlife. Most local herders claimed that they did not kill wildlife, and 42% said they did not kill wildlife because it was a sin in Buddhism. Our results indicate monasteries play an important role in snow leopard conservation. Monastery-based snow leopard conservation could be extended to other Tibetan Buddhist regions that in total would encompass about 80% of the global range of snow leopards.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1400
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Liao, Y.F.
Title The Geographical Distribution of Ounces in Qinghai Province Type Journal Article
Year 1985 Publication Acta Theriologica Sinica Abbreviated Journal
Volume 5 Issue 3 Pages 183-188
Keywords China; Qinghai; distribution; browse; 5470; ounce; panthera; panthera uncia; Panthera-uncia; uncia; province; 20; Qilian; number; 40; Male; Female; park; Adult; bharal; Pseudois; breeding; people; birth; young; Chinese
Abstract This paper deals with the geographical distribution of ounces (Panthera uncia) in Qinghai Province. Ounces are distributed in 20 counties- Guide, Huzhu, Menyuan, Qilian, Tianjun, Dulan, Golmud, Guinan, Xinghai, Zhidoi, Zadoi, Nangqen, Yushu, Chindu, Qumarleb, Madio, Maqen, Jigzhi, Baima, Darlag. Among them, there fore 4 counties- Qilian, Tianjun, Dulan, Zadoi, in which the number of ounces are bigger. The number of ounces are shown in table 2. There are altogether 73 ounces (40 male, 33 female) which is supported to every park of China for ornamental, they were captured by fellow-villagers, and 44 ounces (23 male, 21 female) of them are below 6 months old, 9 ounces (6 male, 3 female) of them are 1 year old, 2 ounces (male) are 2 years old, and 18 ounces (9 male, 9 female) are adults.

Ounces live at an altitude of 3000-4100 metres above the sea, and prefer to eat Bharal (Pseudois noyour). Its breeding period goes from April to June, the number of embryos being 2-3.

A female ounce was successfully reproduced for the first time at Xining People's Park of China, in Spetember, 1984, and she gave birth to 3 young ounces.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Document Type: Chinese Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 531 Serial 617
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lovari, S., Minder, I., Ferretti, F., Mucci, N., Randi, E., Pellizzi, B.
Title Common and snow leopards share prey, but not habitats: competition avoidance by large predators Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Journal of Zoology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 291 Issue Pages 127-135
Keywords coexistence; resource partitioning; food habits; Panthera uncia; Panthera pardus.
Abstract Resource exploitation and behavioural interference underlie competition among

carnivores. Competition is reduced by specializing on different prey and/or spatiotemporal

separation, usually leading to different food habits. We predicted that

two closely related species of large cats, the endangered snow leopard and the

near-threatened common leopard, living in sympatry, would coexist through

habitat separation and exploitation of different prey species. In central Himalaya,

we assessed (2006–2010) habitat and diet overlap between these carnivores. The

snow leopard used grassland and shrubland, whereas the common leopard

selected forest. Contrary to our prediction, snow leopard and common leopard

preyed upon similar wild (Himalayan tahr, musk deer) and domestic species (Bos

spp., dogs). Dietary overlap between snow leopard and common leopard was 69%

(yearly), 76% (colder months) and 60% (warmer months). Thus, habitat separation

should be the result of other factors, most likely avoidance of interspecific

aggression. Habitat separation may not always lead to the use of different prey.

Avoidance of interspecific aggression, rather than exploitation of different

resources, could allow the coexistence of potentially competing large predators.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1402
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lovari, S., Ventimiglia, M., Minder, I.
Title Food habits of two leopard species, competition, climate change and upper treeline: a way to the decrease of an endangered species? Type Journal Article
Year 2013 Publication Ethology Ecology & Evolution Abbreviated Journal
Volume 25 Issue 4 Pages 305-318
Keywords carnivore evolution, coexistence, sympatric species, diet, Panthera uncia, Panthera pardus.
Abstract For carnivore species, spatial avoidance is one of the evolutionary solutions to

coexist in an area, especially if food habits overlap and body sizes tend to coincide.

We reviewed the diets of two large cats of similar sizes, the endangered snow leopard

(Panthera uncia, 16 studies) and the near-threatened common leopard (Panthera par-

dus, 11 studies), in Asia. These cats share ca 10,000 km2 of their mountainous range,

although snow leopards tend to occur at a significantly higher altitude than common

leopards, the former being a cold-adapted species of open habitats, whereas the latter

is an ecologically flexible one, with a preference for woodland. The spectrum of prey

of common leopards was 2.5 times greater than that of snow leopards, with wild prey

being the staple for both species. Livestock rarely contributed much to the diet. When

the breadth of trophic niches was compared, overlap ranged from 0.83 (weight categories)

to one (main food categories). As these leopard species have approximately

the same size and comparable food habits, one can predict that competition will arise

when they live in sympatry. On mountains, climate change has been elevating the

upper forest limit, where both leopard species occur. This means a habitat increase

for common leopards and a substantial habitat reduction for snow leopards, whose

range is going to be squeezed between the forest and the barren rocky altitudes, with

medium- to long-term undesirable effects on the conservation of this endangered cat
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1403
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Lui, C.-guang; Zheng, C.-wu; Ren, J.-rang
Title Research Foods and Food Sources About Snow Leopard (Panthera uncia) Type Miscellaneous
Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume 31 Issue Pages 154-159
Keywords research; foods; food; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; panthera; panthera uncia; Panthera-uncia; uncia; Chinese; deer; kiang; argali; Qinghai; gansu; Sichuan; Comparative; congruence; species; distribution; variation
Abstract During 1984-1987, 1992-1995, and 1998-2001, the author researched snow leopard, white lipped deer, kiang, and argali in Qinghai, Gansu, Xingiang, and Sichuan. He collected 644 snow leopard droppings, and analyzed kinds of foods and sources from perch. Snow leopard's foods include most main foods, main foods, comparative foods and lesser foods. Studied one another

index of faunistic congruence of foods species that from various distribution and variation both perch vertical variety and foods of snow leopard.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full text available in Chinese. Periodical: Journal of Shaanxi Normal University (Natural Science Edition) Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 877 Serial 626
Permanent link to this record