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Author Mallon, D.P.; Nurbu, C.
Title A Conservation Program for the Snow Leopard in Kashmir Type Conference Article
Year 1988 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 207-214
Keywords conservation; ecology; parks; reserves; refuge; habitat; herders; herder; status; Protected-area-network; education; grazing; hunting; furs; pelts; browse; protected; area; network; 1780
Abstract This program was drawn up at the invitation of the Chief Wildlife Warden of the State of Jammu and Kashmir, Mir Inayat Ullah, following joint survey work and discussions held over the period 1980-86. The recomendations have been accepted and will be incorporated into Department of Wildlife Protection policy. The aim of the program is the long term conservation of the snow leopard on a self sustaining basis throughout the state. Two basic assumptions underlie the program: (1) The snow leopard cannot be protected in isolation, but only in the context of conservation of the environment as a whole, and (2) To be most effective, any long term plan needs the cooperation of local people and must take into account their needs and traditional rights.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Snow Leopard Trust and The Wildlife Institute of India Place of Publication India Editor H.Freeman
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full Text at URLTitle, Monographic: Fifth International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: Srinagar, IndiaDate of Copyright: 1988 Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 122 Serial 646
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Author Miller, D.J.; Jackson, R.
Title Livestock and Snow Leopards:making room for competing users on the Tibetian Plateau Type Conference Article
Year 1994 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 315-328
Keywords livestock; Tibet; herder; herders; predator; prey; protected-areas; parks; reserves; refuge; Tibetian-Plateau; ungulates; wild-yak; blue-sheep; pika; marmots; gazelle; antelope; Qomolangma; Namcha-Barwa; Chang-Tang; habitat; grazing; wolves; pens; enclosures; bounties; bounty; pelts; skins; coats; furs; poisoning; medicine; bones; land-use; conservation; ecology; blue; sheep; browse; tibetian; plateau; wild; yak; namcha; barwa; change; tang; land use; land; 2800
Abstract
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Islt Place of Publication Usa Editor J.L.Fox; D.Jizeng
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full Text at URLTitle, Monographic: Seventh International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: ChinaDate of Copyright: 1994 Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 244 Serial 676
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Author Oli, M.K.
Title Snow leopards and local human population in a protected area: a case study from the Nepalese Himalaya Type Conference Article
Year 1994 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 51-64
Keywords Nepal; Himalaya; herders; herder; livestock; conservation; annapurna; protected-area; park; parks; reserve; refuge; blue-sheep; predator; prey; habitat; radio-tracking; diet; scat; feces; fecal; marmot; Manang; poaching; hunting; pelts; skins; furs; coats; grazing; burning; trekking; tourism; education; religion; blue; sheep; browse; protected; area; protected area; radio tracking; radio; tracking; annapurna conservation area; Annapurna-Conservation-Area; 2110
Abstract
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher International Snow Leopard Trust, Seattle, Washington Place of Publication Usa Editor J.L.Fox; D.Jizeng
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full Text at URLTitle, Monographic: Proceedings of the Seventh International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: ChinaDate of Copyright: 1994 Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 240 Serial 748
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Author Schaller, G.
Title Surveys of Mountain Wildlife in China, Report # 6 Type Miscellaneous
Year 1987 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 10
Keywords Xinjiang; Tian-Shan; Tomur-Feng; tibetan-plateau; Altun; surveys; methods; hunting; livestock; grazing; browse; 4200
Abstract
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full Text Available at URL Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 408 Serial 854
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Author Xu, F.; Ming, M.; Yin, S.-jing; Chundawat R.S.; Marden; Nui, Y.
Title Preliminary Study on the Habitat Selection of Uncia uncia Type Miscellaneous
Year 2006 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume 23 Issue Pages 471-473
Keywords study; habitat; Habitat selection; selection; uncia; Uncia uncia; Uncia-uncia; Chinese; research; large; species; extinction; Felidae; central; mountains; mountain; Xinjiang; Tianshan Mountains; Altay; national; nature; reserve; fieldwork; sign; grazing; status; Test; analysis; primary; factor; topography; valley
Abstract Uncia uncia is one of the rare large species on the brink of extinction in Felidae in the world, and inhabit only the Central Asian mountains. It is said that there are currently only 4500-7300 Uncia uncia surviving. During the period from September 2004 to July 2005, the habitat selection of Uncia uncia was investigated in some mountains in Xinjiang, including the eastern Tianshan Mountains, Beita Mountains, Altay Mounts and Mount Tumor National Nature Reserve. In several months of fieldwork, we got 171 sign samples of Uncia uncia and 123 random samples in total. Five habitat features, i.e., the elevation, topographic features, vegetation type, grazing status and ruggedness, are selected to compare the difference of selectivity of the Uncia uncia habitat selection. The Chi-square goodness-of-fit test and the binomial test are used to check the significance of Uncia uncia habitat selection, and the principal component analysis is used to find the primary factors in in the selection. The result s are as follows : (1) Uncia uncia selected all kinds of the habitat types , especially the elevation , topography , vegetation types and ruggedness ; (2) Ruggedness and the vegetation types are the preliminary factors for the habitat selection. Topography is the secondary factor ; (3) Uncia uncia prefer to inhabit in the rugged habitat s with moderate shrubberies , and they also like to leave signs in valley bottoms rather than hillsides.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Area Expedition Conference
Notes Full text available in ChineseName of periodical: Arid Zone Research Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 871 Serial 1036
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Author Jackson, R.
Title Threatened wildlife, crop, and livestock depredation and grazing in the Makalu-Barun Conservation Area Type Report
Year 1990 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue April Pages 1-105
Keywords Nepal, Makalu-Barun Conservation Area, grazing, depredation
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1170
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Author Kohli, K., Sankaran, M., Suryawanshi, K. R., Mishra, C
Title A penny saved is a penny earned: lean season foraging strategy of an alpine ungulate Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication (up) Animal Behaviour Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 92 Pages 93-100
Keywords blue sheep, grazing, herbivore, mountain ungulate, optimal foraging, Pseudois nayaur, trans-Himalaya
Abstract Lean season foraging strategies are critical for the survival of species inhabiting highly seasonal environments

such as alpine regions. However, inferring foraging strategies is often difficult because of

challenges associated with empirically estimating energetic costs and gains of foraging in the field. We

generated qualitative predictions for the relationship between daily winter foraging time, body size and

forage availability for three contrasting foraging strategies including time minimization, energy intake

maximization and net energy maximization. Our model predicts that for animals employing a time

minimization strategy, daily winter foraging time should not change with body size and should increase

with a reduction in forage availability. For energy intake maximization, foraging time should not vary

with either body size or forage availability. In contrast, for a net energy maximization strategy, foraging

time should decrease with increase in body size and with a reduction in forage availability. We contrasted

proportion of daily time spent foraging by bharal, Pseudois nayaur, a dimorphic grazer, across

different body size classes in two high-altitude sites differing in forage availability. Our results indicate

that bharal behave as net energy maximizers during winter. As predicted by the net energy maximization

strategy, daily winter foraging time of bharal declined with increasing body size, and was lower in the

site with low forage availability. Furthermore, as predicted by our model, foraging time declined as the

winter season progressed. We did not find support for the time minimizing or energy intake maximizing

strategies. Our qualitative model uses relative rather than absolute costs and gains of foraging which are

often difficult to estimate in the field. It thus offers a simple way to make informed inferences regarding

animal foraging strategies by contrasting estimates of daily foraging time across gradients of body size

and forage availability.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1409
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Author Bagchi, S.; Mishra, C.; Bhatnagar, Y.
Title Conflicts between traditional pastoralism and conservation of Himalayan ibex (Capra sibirica) in the Trans-Himalayan mountains Type Journal Article
Year 2004 Publication (up) Animal Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 7 Issue Pages 121-128
Keywords conflicts; traditional pastoralism; himalayan ibex; ibex; capra sibirica; trans-himalayan mountains; pin valley national park; spiti region; non-metric multidimensional scaling; snow leopard; wolf; wild dog; Lynx; wild ass; Tibetan argali; Tibetan antelope; Tibetan gazelle; urial; bharal; Pin River; pin valley; Parahio; goat; sheep; Cattle; horses; yaks; donkeys; diet; free-ranging horses; herded horses; grazing; 5290
Abstract There is recent evidence to suggest that domestic livestock deplete the density and diversity of wild herbivores in the cold deserts of the Trans-Himalaya by imposing resource limitations. To ascertain the degree and nature of threats faced by Himalayan ibex (Capra sibirica) from seven livestock species, we studied their resource use patterns over space, habitat and food dimensions in the pastures of Pin Valley National Park in the Spiti region of the Indian Himalaya. Species diet profiles were obtained by direct observations. We assessed the similarity in habitat use and diets of ibex and livestock using Non-Metric Multidimensional Scaling. We estimated the influence of the spatial distribution of livestock on habitat and diet choice of ibex by examining their co-occurrence patterns in cells overlaid on the pastures. The observed co-occurrence of ibex and livestock in cells was compared with null-models generated through Monte Carlo simulations. The results suggest that goats and sheep impose resource limitations on ibex and exclude them from certain pastures. In the remaining suitable habitat, ibex share forage with horses. Ibex remained relatively unaffected by other livestock such as yaks, donkeys and cattle. However, most livestock removed large amounts of forage from the pastures (nearly 250 kg of dry matter/day by certain species), thereby reducing forage availability for ibex. Pertinent conservation issues are discussed in the light of multiple-use of parks and current socio-economic transitions in the region, which call for integrating social and ecological feedback into management planning.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 514 Serial 106
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Author Sharma, R. K., Bhatnagar, Y. V., Mishra, C.
Title Does livestock benefit or harm snow leopards? Type Journal Article
Year 201 Publication (up) Biological Conservatio Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 190 Pages 8-13
Keywords Panthera uncia, Trans-Himalaya, Pastoralism, Large carnivores, Livestock grazing, Co-existence
Abstract Large carnivores commonly prey on livestock when their ranges overlap. Pastoralism is the dominant land use type across the distributional range of the endangered snow leopard Panthera uncia. Snow leop- ards are often killed in retaliation against livestock depredation. Whether livestock, by forming an alter- native prey, could potentially benefit snow leopards, or, whether livestock use of an area is detrimental to snow leopards is poorly understood. We examined snow leopard habitat use in a multiple use landscape that was comprised of sites varying in livestock abundance, wild prey abundance and human population size. We photographically sampled ten sites (average size 70 sq. km) using ten camera traps in each site, deployed for a period of 60 days. Snow leopard habitat use was computed as a Relative Use Index based on the total independent photographic captures and the number of snow leopard individuals captured at each site. We quantified livestock abundance, wild prey abundance, human population size and terrain ruggedness in each of the sites. Key variables influencing snow leopard habitat use were identified using Information Theory based model selection approach. Snow leopard habitat use was best explained by wild prey density, and showed a positive linear relationship with the abundance of wild ungulates. We found a hump-shaped relationship between snow leopard habitat use and livestock stocking density, with an initial increase in habitat use followed by a decline beyond a threshold of livestock density. Our results suggest that in the absence of direct persecution of snow leopards, livestock grazing and snow leopard habitat use are potentially compatible up to a certain threshold of livestock density, beyond which habitat use declines, presumably due to depressed wild ungulate abundance and associated anthropogenic disturbance.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
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Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1426
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Author Mishra, C.; Rawat, G.S.
Title Livestock grazing and Biodiversity Conservation: Comments on Saberwal Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication (up) Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 12 Issue Pages 25-32
Keywords conservation; Saberwal; biodiversity; livestock; grazing; predator; prey; browse; 1950
Abstract
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Document Type: English Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 341 Serial 690
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