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Author (up) Allen, P.
Title Conservation Increases Crafts Income Type Miscellaneous
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Winter, 2002 Issue Pages 7
Keywords crafts; conservation; herders; Sle; snow-leopard-enterprises; nomadic; Mongolia; wool; income; tourists; poaching; incentive; livestock; zoos; browse; 4310
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Notes Full Text at URLJournal Title: Crafts News Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 419 Serial 67
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Author (up) Allen, P.
Title WWF Progress Report: Irbis Enterprises Snow Leopard Conservation Incentive Project Type Miscellaneous
Year 1999 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords irbis; conservation; herders; livestock; economics; Mongolia; gobi; poaching; community-development; development; browse; community; 4100
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Notes Location: Uvs Aimag (Turgen and Tsagaan Shuvuut Strictly Protected Areas)Gobi Altai Aimag (Great Gobi Strictly Protected Area) Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 355 Serial 65
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Author (up) Allen, P.; Macray, D.
Title Snow Leopard Enterprises Description and Summarized Business Plan Type Conference Article
Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords snow; leopard; enterprises; buisness; plan; habitat; humans; conflict; irbis; products; wool; conservation; marketing; Mongolia; social; economic; conflicts; country; countries; socks; hats; gloves; 4890; Human; snow leopards; snow leopard; snow-leopards; snow-leopard; leopards; central; Central Asia; asia; ecosystem; region; populations; population; herders; herder; threat; potential; impact; environment; Elements; landscape; International; international snow leopard trust; International-Snow-Leopard-Trust; trust; snow-leopard-enterprises
Abstract The habitat for both humans and snow leopards in Central Asia is marginal, the ecosystem fragile. The struggle for humans to survive has often, unfortunately, brought them into conflict with the region's dwindling snow leopard populations. Herders commonly see leopards as a threat to their way of life and well-being. Efforts to improve the living conditions of humans must consider potential impacts on the environment. Likewise, conservation initiatives cannot ignore humans as elements of the landscape with a right to live with dignity and pride. Based on these principles, the International Snow Leopard Trust has developed a new conservation model that addresses the needs of all concerned.

We call it Snow Leopard Enterprises..
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Publisher Islt Place of Publication Seattle Editor
Language English Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Title, Monographic: Proceedings of the Snow Leopard Survival SummitPlace of Meeting: Seattle,WA Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 475 Serial 68
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Author (up) Anonymous
Title Snow leopard management plan of Mongolia (draft) Type Report
Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-18
Keywords snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; management; plan; Mongolia; Report; world wildlife fund; world-wildlife-fund; wildlife; country; countries; Uvs; protected; protected area; protected-area; area; administration; nature; environment; 2000
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Notes Report prepared in collaboration among the World Wildlife Fund Mongolia country office, Uvs Nuur Protected Area Administration, the Ministry of Nature and the Environment, and concerned agencies and individuals. March 2000. Draft. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 993 Serial 91
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Author (up) Anonymous
Title A snow leopard conservation plan for Mongolia Type Report
Year 2000 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 1-8
Keywords awareness; behaviour; biodiversity; conservation plan; decline; density; ecology; fund-raising; funding; habitat degradation; Himalayan; management; Mongolia; montane; pastoralists; pelt; predator; snow-leopard-conservation-plan; snow leopard; trade; Wwf
Abstract The snow leopard faces multiple threats in the Himalayan region, from habitat degradation, loss of prey, the trade in pelts, parts and live animals, and conflict with humans, primarily pastoralists. Consequently, the populations are considered to be in decline and the species is listed as Endangered in the IUCN's Red List. As a 'flagship' and 'umbrella' species the snow leopard can be a unifying biological feature to raise awareness of its plight and the need for conservation, which will benefit other facets of Himalayan biodiversity as well. Some studies of snow leopards have been conducted in the Himalayan region. But, because of its elusive nature and preference for remote and inaccessible habitat, knowledge of the ecology and behaviour of this mystical montane predator is scant. The available information, however, suggests that snow leopards occur at low densities and large areas of habitat are required to conserve a viable population. Thus, many researchers and conservationists have advocated landscape-scale approaches to conservation within a regional context, rather than focusing on individual protected areas.This regional strategy for WWF's snow leopard conservation program is built on such an approach. The following were identified as important regional issues: 1) international trade in snow leopards and parts; 2) the human-snow leopard conflict; 3) the need for a landscape approach to conservation to provide large spatial areas that can support demographically and ecologically viable snow leopard metapopulations; 4) research on snow leopard ecology to develop long-term, science-based conservation management plans; and 5) regional coordination and dialog. While the issues are regional, the WWF's in the region have developed 5-year strategic actions and activities, using the regional strategies as a touchstone, which will be implemented at national levels. The WWF's will develop proposals based on these strategic actions, with estimated budgets, for use by the network for funding and fund-raising. WWF also recognizes the need to collaborate and coordinate within the network and with other organizations in the region to achieve conservation goals in an efficient manner, and will form a working group to coordinate activities and monitor progress.
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Notes Publication date unknown but must be at least from 2000. Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 995 Serial 92
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Author (up) Anonymous
Title Resolutions Conservation of Snow Leopard, Seventh International Snow Leopard Symposium Type Conference Article
Year 1994 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 329-331
Keywords resolutions; conservation; management; Khunjerab; Taxkorgan; Sagarmatha; Makalu-Barun; Qomolangma; Transboundry; protected-areas; parks; reserves; refuge; Nepal; Tibet; China; Pakistan; Cites; Slims; eco-development; livestock; herders; conflict; siberia; gobi; Altay; Altai; Mongolia; Arksai; Liqaru; Arba; Ganzi; Baoxin; pollution; pesticides; toxicity; cooperation; status; zoos; zoological-gardens; browse; protected; area; areas; protected area; protected areas; eco development; eco; development; zoological; gardens; zoological gardens; 3530
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Publisher Islt Place of Publication Usa Editor J.L.Fox; D.Jizeng
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Notes Full Text at URLTitle, Monographic: Seventh International Snow Leopard SymposiumPlace of Meeting: ChinaDate of Copyright: 1994 Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 214 Serial 82
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Author (up) Anonymous
Title In Mongolia, Taking Stock of Rare Animals Type Miscellaneous
Year 1990 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Mongolia; radio-collars; gobi; bears; Camels; Schaller; Tserendeleg; hutning; poaching; 4870
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 473 Serial 79
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Author (up) Augugliaro, C., Christe, P., Janchivlamdan, C., Baymanday, H., Zimmermann, F.
Title Patterns of human interaction with snow leopard and co-predators in the Mongolian western Altai: Current issues and perspectives Type Journal Article
Year 2020 Publication Global Ecology and Conservation Abbreviated Journal
Volume 24 Issue Pages 1-21
Keywords Depredation Human-carnivores interaction Mongolian altai Snow leopard Wolf Wolverine
Abstract Large carnivores can cause considerable economic damage,

mainly due to livestock depredation. These conficts instigate negative

attitude towards their conservation, which could in the extreme case

lead to retaliatory killing. Here we focus on the snow leopard (Panthera

uncia), a species of conservation concern with particularly large

spatial requirements. We conducted the study in the Bayan Olgii

province, one of the poorest provinces of Mongolia, where the majority

of the human population are traditional herders. We conducted a survey

among herders (N 261) through a semi-structured questionnaire with the

aim to assess: the current and future herding practices and prevention

measures, herders’ perceptions and knowledge of the environmental

protection and hunting laws; the perceived livestock losses to snow

leopard, wolf (Canis lupus), and wolverine (Gulo gulo), as well as to

non-predatory factors; the key factors affecting livestock losses to

these three large carnivores; and, finally, the attitudes towards these

three large carnivores. Non-predatory causes of mortality were slightly

higher than depredation cases, representing 4.5% and 4.3% of livestock

holdings respectively. While no depredation of livestock was reported

from wolverines, snow leopard and wolf depredation made up 0.2% and 4.1%

of total livestock holdings, respectively. Herders’ attitudes towards

the three large carnivores were negatively affected by the magnitude of

the damages since they had a positive overall attitude towards both snow

leopard and wolverine, whereas the attitude towards wolf was negative.

We discuss conservation and management options to mitigate herder-snow

leopard impacts. To palliate the negative consequences of the increasing

trend in livestock numbers, herd size reduction should be encouraged by

adding economic value to the individual livestock and/or by promoting

alternative income and/or ecotourism. Furthermore, co-management between

government and stakeholders would help tackle this complex problem, with

herders playing a major role in the development of livestock management

strategies. Traditional practices, such as regularly shifting campsites

and using dogs and corrals at night, could reduce livestock losses

caused by snow leopards.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number Serial 1627
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Author (up) Bannikov, A.
Title Mammals of the Mongolian People's Republic Type Book Whole
Year 1954 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords Mongolia; snow-leopard; browse; 2680; Russian
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Publisher Academy of Sciences Place of Publication Moscow Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
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Notes Russian Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rana @ 15 Serial 116
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Author (up) Berger, J., Buuveibaatar, B., Mishra, C.
Title Globalization of the Cashmere Market and the Decline of Large Mammals in Central Asia Type Journal Article
Year Publication Conservation Biology Abbreviated Journal
Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 679-689
Keywords fashion, herders, India, Mongolia, saiga, trade
Abstract As drivers of terrestrial ecosystems, humans have replaced large carnivores in most areas, and

human influence not only exerts striking ecological pressures on biodiversity at local scales but also has

indirect effects in distant corners of the world. We suggest that the multibillion dollar cashmere industry

creates economic motivations that link western fashion preferences for cashmere to land use in Central

Asia. This penchant for stylish clothing, in turn, encourages herders to increase livestock production which

affects persistence of over 6 endangered large mammals in these remote, arid ecosystems. We hypothesized

that global trade in cashmere has strong negative effects on native large mammals of deserts and grassland

where cashmere-producing goats are raised. We used time series data, ecological snapshots of the biomass

of native and domestic ungulates, and ecologically and behaviorally based fieldwork to test our hypothesis.

In Mongolia increases in domestic goat production were associated with a 3-fold increase in local profits for

herders coexisting with endangered saiga (Saiga tatarica). That increasing domestic grazing pressure carries

fitness consequences was inferred on the basis of an approximately 4-fold difference in juvenile recruitment among blue sheep (Pseudois nayaur) in trans-Himalayan India. Across 7 study areas in Mongolia, India, and China’s Tibetan Plateau, native ungulate biomass is now <5% that of domestic species. Such trends suggest ecosystem degradation and decreased capacity for the persistence of native species, including at least 8 Asian endemic species: saiga, chiru (Pantholops hodgsoni), Bactrian camel (Camelus bactrianus), snow leopard (Panthera uncia), khulan (Equus hemionus), kiang (E. kiang), takhi (E. przewalski), and wild yak (Bos mutus). Our results suggest striking yet indirect and unintended actions that link trophic-level effects to markets induced by the trade for cashmere.
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Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1398
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