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Author (up) Hussain, S. url  openurl
  Title Protecting the snow leopard and enhancing farmers' livelihoods: A pilot insurance scheme in Baltistan Type Journal Article
  Year 2000 Publication Mountain-Research-and-Development. Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 20 Issue Pages 226-231  
  Keywords Uncia-uncia; snow-leopard; Felidae; protection; Human; Hominidae; farmer; livestock; Mammalia; Project-snow-leopard; economic-evaluation; ecotourism-activities; farmer-livelihood; insurance-scheme; mountain-livelihood; retaliatory-killings; snow leopard; browse; Uncia uncia; uncia; project snow leopard; economic evaluation; evaluation; economic; ecotourism activities; ecotourism; activities; farmer livelihood; livelihood; mountain livelihood; mountain; retaliatory killings; retaliatory; killings; 20  
  Abstract Snow leopards that prey on poor farmers' livestock pose a twofold problem: they endanger farmers' precarious mountain livelihoods as well as the survival of the snow leopard as a unique species since farmers engage in retaliatory killings. Project Snow Leopard (PSL), a recent pilot initiative in Baltistan, involves a partnership between local farmers and private enterprise in the form of an insurance scheme combined with ecotourism activities. Farmers jointly finance the insurance scheme through the payment of premiums per head of livestock they own, while the remaining funds are provided by profits from trekking expeditions focusing on the snow leopard. The insurance scheme is jointly managed by a village management committee and PSL staff. The scheme is structured in such a way that villagers monitor each other and have incentives to avoid cheating the system.  
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  Notes Document Type: English Call Number: Call number: GB500 .M68 Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 389 Serial 399  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Jain, N.; Wangchuk, R.; Jackson, R. url  openurl
  Title An Assessment of CBT and Homestay Sites in Spiti District, Himachal Pradesh Type Report
  Year 2003 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-14  
  Keywords assessment; Himachal; himachal pradesh; Himachal-Pradesh; United; Organization; survey; Report; activities; activity; mountain; Tmi; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; Snow Leopard Conservancy; leopard; Ladakh; States; India; Himalayan; program; conservation; local; livelihood; asia  
  Abstract The survey described in this report builds upon prior CBT activities undertaken by The Mountain Institute (TMI) in partnership with the Snow Leopard Conservancy (SLC) in Ladakh, supported by a grant from UNESCO (with co-financing from SLC). Under the evolving concept of “Himalayan Homestays”, initially developed and tested in Ladakh, it is proposed that activities be expanded to selected states in India in a strategic and effective way. Himalayan Homestays are part of a larger integrated program to link snow leopard conservation with local livelihoods in Asia.  
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  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Supported by: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1019 Serial 483  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Kanderian, N., Lawson, D., Zahler, P. openurl 
  Title Current status of wildlife and conservation in Afghanistan Type Journal Article
  Year 2011 Publication International Journal of Environmental Studies Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume 68 Issue 3 Pages 281-298  
  Keywords Afghanistan; Biodiversity; Deforestation; Hunting; Illegal trade; Agriculture; Livelihood; Governance; Survey; Training  
  Abstract Afghanistan’s position in latitude, geography and at the intersection of three biogeographic realms has resulted in a surprising biodiversity. Its wildlife includes species such as the snow leopard, Asiatic black bear, Marco Polo sheep, markhor and greater flamingo. Principal threats include high levels of deforestation, land encroachment and hunting for food and trade. Continuing security issues have also made it difficult to monitor species abundance and population trends. Over the last decade, however, survey efforts have provided the first collection of species and habitat data since the late 1970s. Initial findings are enabling the Government and rural communities to begin implementing important conservation measures. This process has included policy development and protected area planning, promoting alternative livelihoods and responsible community management, and continuing research into the status of biodiversity in the field.  
  Address Wildlife Conservation Society, 2300 Southern Blvd, New York, 10460, USA  
  Corporate Author Wildlife Conservation Society Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Editor  
  Language English Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ Serial 1348  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Maheshwari, A. , Sathyakumar, S. url  doi
openurl 
  Title Snow leopard stewardship in mitigating human-wildlife conflict in Hemis National Park, Ladakh, India Type Journal Article
  Year 2019 Publication Human Dimensions of Wildlife Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-5  
  Keywords Snow leopard; human-wildlife conflict; ecotourism; livelihood; India  
  Abstract Among large predators, snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and co-predators (e.g., wolves

Canis lupus, lynx Lynx lynx) often cause economic losses, engendering animosity from

local communities in the mountain ecosystem across south and central Asia (Din et al.,

2017; Jackson & Lama, 2016; Maheshwari, Takpa, Kujur, & Shawl, 2010; Schaller, 2012).

These economic losses range from around US $50 to nearly $300 per household,

a significant sum given per capita annual incomes of $250 – $400 (Jackson & Wangchuk,

2004; Mishra, 1997). Recent efforts such as improved livestock husbandry practices

(predator-proof livestock corrals – closed night shelters with covered roof with wiremesh

and a closely fitting iron or wooden door that can be securely locked at night) and

community-based ecotourism (e.g., home stays, guides, porters, pack animals, campsites)

are providing alternative livelihood opportunities and mitigating large carnivores – human

conflict in the snow leopard habitats (Hanson, Schutgens, & Baral, 2018; Jackson, 2015;

Jackson & Lama, 2016; Vannelli, Hampton, Namgail, & Black, 2019). Snow leopard-based

ecotourism provides an opportunity to secure livelihoods and reduce poverty of the

communities living in ecotourism sites across Ladakh (Chandola, 2012; Jackson, 2015).

To understand the role of snow leopard-based ecotourism in uplifting the financial profile

of local communities, mitigating large carnivore – human conflict and eventually changing

attitudes towards large carnivores in Hemis National Park, Ladakh, India, we compared

the estimated financial gains of a snow leopard-based ecotourism to stated livestock

predation losses by snow leopards and wolves.
 
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  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1484  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) The Snow Leopard Conservancy url  openurl
  Title A Learning Tour of the CBN (Corbett, Nainital and Binsar) Eco-tourism Initiative Sites by Villagers from Hemis National Park and the Surrounding Area (18-28th November 2002) Type Report
  Year 2002 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume SLC Field Document Series No 5 Issue Pages  
  Keywords Ladakh; Himalayas; Himalaya; Karakoram; mountains; mountain; landscape; tourists; trans-himalayan; transhimalayan; biodiversity; home; snow; snow leopard; snow-leopard; leopard; tourism; number; ecotourism; 80; conservation; traditional; local; community; Culture; income; people; leh; travel; rural; Snow Leopard Conservancy; ecotourism activities; ecotourism-activities; activities; activity; Hemis; national; national park; National-park; park; livelihood; loss; livestock; Animals; Animal; local people; NGO's; eco-tourism; villagers; area  
  Abstract Ladakh lies between the Great Himalayas and the formidable Karakoram mountains.

Its unique landscape and rich cultural heritage have been a great attraction to tourists all over

the world. Apart from its uniqueness it has a rich Trans-Himalayan bio-diversity and is home

to the rare and elusive snow leopard. It opened to tourism in 1974 with a handful of tourists

and has gone up to the present number of about 18,000 visitors annually. Ecotourism started in Ladakh in mid 80s in the form of conservation of traditional

architecture when local communities realized the importance of their rich culture and

traditions being valued by the visiting tourists. However, while tourism became a major

source of income to people in Leh, most of the benefits stayed with outside (Delhi) based

travel agents thus leaving out the rural masses. During the last three years Snow Leopard Conservancy and The Mountain Institute have been

initiating ecotourism activities with local communities in the Hemis National Park as an

alternate livelihood and an indirect way to compensate losses of livestock from predatory

animals. However, local people while venturing into such new initiatives have tended to be

like blind men that are being led by NGO's so that they do not stumble along their paths.
 
  Address  
  Corporate Author Thesis  
  Publisher Place of Publication Leh, Ladakh, India Editor Wangchuk, R.; Dadul, J.  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
  Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title  
  Series Volume Series Issue Edition  
  ISSN ISBN Medium  
  Area Expedition Conference  
  Notes Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1025 Serial 963  
Permanent link to this record
 

 
Author (up) Wingard, J.R.; Zahler, P. url  openurl
  Title Silent Steppe: The Illegal Wildlife Trade Crisis in Mongolia Type Report
  Year 2006 Publication Abbreviated Journal  
  Volume Issue Pages 1-170  
  Keywords steppe; illegal; wildlife; trade; Mongolia; study; threat; populations; population; areas; area; fur; fur trade; fur-trade; game; meat; hunting; Chain; impact; biodiversity; Biodiversity conservation; conservation; rural; livelihood; Wildlife-Management; management; survey; survey methods; methods; history; action; International; enforcement; domestic; community-based; approach  
  Abstract The current study in Mongolia is truly groundbreaking, in that it shows that the problem of commercial wildlife trade is also vast, unsustainable, and a major threat to wildlife populations in other areas. This paper's Executive Summary briefs the topics of wildlife trade in Mongolia, fur trade, medicinal trade, game meat trade, trophy and sport hunting, trade chains and markets, trade sustainability, impacts of wildlife trade on biodiversity conservation, impacts of trade on rural livelihoods, enabling wildlife management, and management recommendations. The main content of the paper includes: wildlife trade survey methods, a history of wildlife trade in Mongolia, wildlife take and trade today, enabling wildlife management, and recommendations and priority actions. The recommendations have been divided into six separate sections, including (1) cross-cutting recommendations, (2) international trade enforcement, (3) domestic trade enforcement, (4) hunting management, (5) trophy and sport hunting management, and (6) community-based approaches. Each section identifies short-term, long-term, and regulatory goals in order of priority within each subsection.  
  Address  
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  Publisher World Bank Place of Publication Washington, D.C. Editor East Asia and Pacific Environment and Social Development Department  
  Language Summary Language Original Title  
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  ISSN ISBN Medium  
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  Notes Mongolian version. English language translation is also available in the SLN bibliography. Mongolia Discussion Papers. East Asia and Pacific Environment and Social Development Department. Washington D.C.: World Bank. Approved no  
  Call Number SLN @ rana @ 1079 Serial 1026  
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