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Author Maming, R.
Title Market prices for the tissues and organs of snow leopards in China Type Journal Article
Year 2012 Publication Selevinia Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue 20 Pages 119-122
Keywords trade; cases; products; prices; bazaars; snow leopards; extinction; Xinjiang
Abstract The population of snow leopard (Uncia uncia) is plummeting as waterfall in

the last ten years. The illegal trade of snow leopard products is one of the fatal

factors. The biggest range and the biggest population of snow leopard both are in

China, and the largest trade is also in the country. Through questionnaires and

investigation with informants from 2002 to 2012, a lot of data were collected

through variety ways in different regions. In this paper 387 cases of snow leopard

poaching including smuggling routes, product list, price system and product usages

from Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region were collected for analysis and discussion. In

the face of rapid development in the west of China, the results showed that our

government did not try to protect the snow leopards, and the text of law was

practically useless. International organizations such as WWF, WCS, IUCN, PANTHERA,

SLT & SLN with SLSS were also powerless and helpless to stop snow leopard poaching

and trading. As a result, the fate of the snow leopard is very bad, and this is

worrying.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area (up) Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1395
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Author Xu, G.,MaMing, R.,Buzzard, P.,Blank, D.
Title Nature reserve in Xingjiang: a snow leopard paradise or refuge for how long? Type Journal Article
Year 2014 Publication Selevinia Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue Pages 144-149
Keywords Snow Leopards
Abstract The snow leopard Uncia uncia is an endangered species, which is widely but thinly

distributed throughout its range in the mountains of Central Asia. China contains as

much as 60% of the snow leopard’s potential habitat and has the largest population

of this species. Xinjiang is the largest province in China, covering an area of 1.66

million km² or about one-sixth of the land area of China. Xinjiang is one of the

most important areas for snow leopards with much potential habitat in mountain

ranges such as the north and south Tienshan and Kunlun containing almost 30% of the

world’s snow leopard population. By the end of 2013, total 35 natural reserves have

been established in Xinjiang, and 20 of these areas have snow leopards (Ma et al,

2013). In this paper, we report on the status of snow leopards in these protected

areas and show that they play an important role in protecting snow leopards and

their habitats. Then, we discuss the many problems and challenges faced by these

protected areas.
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Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area (up) Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1423
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Author Wu, D., Maming, R., Xu, G., Zhu X., Buzzard, P.
Title Relationship between ibex and snow leopard about food chain and population density in Tian Shan Type Journal Article
Year 2015 Publication Selevinia Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 186-190
Keywords diet, ibex, snow leopard
Abstract Many studies have demonstrated that ibex (Capra sibirica) are the most frequently eaten prey of snow

leopards (Panthera uncia) in Xinjiang, the west of China. Thus, an understanding of interactions between these species may have significant management and conservation of implications for both. In this study, we provide information on ibex grouping and density over a 24 month period in the Tian Shan of Xinjiang, China. We then use ibex density to estimate the density of snow leopards. We observed ibex primarily in ewe-lamb groups (N=880), but ibex sexual segregation and grouping changed seasonally with more mixed-sex groups during the winter rut. We observed the most ibex in April 2014 and 2015 with an average of (2422 ± 119 ibex). Over the 1643 km2 study area we then estimated an ibex density of 154 ± 23 ibex /100 km2 from which we estimated a density of 1.31~2.58 snow leopards/100 km2.
Address
Corporate Author Thesis
Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area (up) Expedition Conference
Notes Approved no
Call Number SLN @ rakhee @ Serial 1439
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